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Transformations of agricultural extension services in the EU: Towards a lack of adequate knowledge for small-scale farms

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  • Labarthe, Pierre
  • Laurent, Catherine E.

Abstract

This paper examines the consequences of the transformations of extension services for small scale farms. It presents the results of investigations embedded in regulation theory, which combine a comparative institutional analysis, statistical data processing (national agricultural census) and direct surveys. We describe the transformations in the EU and show that they make it more difficult for small farms to access extension services and to benefit from “front office” support (i.e. direct advice from extensionists). Finally, we emphasize that due to the modification of the knowledge production regime, these small farms may also suffer new specific adverse effects resulting from the re-organization of the "back-office" R&D activities of these extension services (i.e. knowledge base updating, database building, scientific experiments, etc.).

Suggested Citation

  • Labarthe, Pierre & Laurent, Catherine E., 2009. "Transformations of agricultural extension services in the EU: Towards a lack of adequate knowledge for small-scale farms," 111th Seminar, June 26-27, 2009, Canterbury, UK 52859, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa111:52859
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/52859
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christoph R. Weiss, 1999. "Farm Growth and Survival: Econometric Evidence for Individual Farms in Upper Austria," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(1), pages 103-116.
    2. Jean-Pierre Butault & Nathalie Delame, 2005. "Concentration de la production agricole et croissance des exploitations," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 390(1), pages 47-64.
    3. Janvry, Alain de & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2001. "Income Strategies Among Rural Households in Mexico: The Role of Off-farm Activities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 467-480, March.
    4. Ayal Kimhi, 2000. "Is Part-Time Farming Really a Step in the Way Out of Agricultural?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(1), pages 38-48.
    5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
    6. Hallam, David & Machado, Fernando, 1996. "Efficiency Analysis with Panel Data: A Study of Portuguese Dairy Farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 79-93.
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    Cited by:

    1. De Rosa, Marcello & Chiappini, Silvia, 2012. "The adoption of agricultural extension policies in the Italian farms," 126th Seminar, June 27-29, 2012, Capri, Italy 126155, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Bartoli, Luca & De Rosa, Marcello & La Rocca, Giuseppe, 4. "Which Organizational Models Stimulate Higher Access To Agricultural Extension Services? Empirical Evidence From Italy," Politica Agricola Internazionale - International Agricultural Policy, Edizioni L’Informatore Agrario, issue 4.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural extension services; Small-scale farms; Institutional Analysis; Europe; Knowledge; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Q16; Q12; B52; P51; D83;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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