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Moving beyond the rhetoric of pluralism: Suggestions for an "inside-the-mainstream" heterodoxy

In: How Economics Should Be Done

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  • David Colander

Abstract

David Colander has been writing about economic methodology for over 30 years, but he goes out of his way to emphasize that he does not see himself as a methodologist. His pragmatic methodology is applicable to what economists are doing and attempts to answer questions that all economists face as they go about their work. The articles collected in this volume are divided, with the first part providing a framework underlying Colander’s methodology and introducing Colander’s methodology for economic policy within that framework. Part two presents Colander’s view on the methodology for microeconomics, while part three looks at Colander’s methodology for macroeconomics. The book closes with discussions of broader issues.

Suggested Citation

  • David Colander, 2018. "Moving beyond the rhetoric of pluralism: Suggestions for an "inside-the-mainstream" heterodoxy," Chapters, in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 16, pages 228-239, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:17588_16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Colander, 2004. "Economics as an Ideologically Challenged Science," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0411, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    2. Colander, David & Klamer, Arjo, 1987. "The Making of an Economist," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 95-111, Fall.
    3. David Colander & Richard Holt & J. Rosser, 2007. "Live and dead issues in the methodology of economics," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 303-312.
    4. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 157-176, June.
    5. Johnson, Harry G., 1982. "On Economics and Society," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226401638, February.
    6. David Colander, 2005. "What Economists Teach and What Economists Do," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 249-260, July.
    7. David Colander, 2003. "Post Walrasian Macroeconomics and Heterodoxy : Thinking Outside the Heterodox Box," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 68-81.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ross Guest, 2013. "Towards Learning Standards in Economics in Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(1), pages 51-66, March.
    2. David Colander, 2009. "How Did Macro Theory Get So Far off Track, and what Can Heterodox Macroeconomists Do to Get it Back On Track?," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0911, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    3. Florentin Gloetzl & Ernest Aigner, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economics Papers ieep5, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    4. Robert Garnett, 2011. "Pluralism, Academic Freedom, and Heterodox Economics," Working Papers 201107, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    5. Glötzl, Florentin & Aigner, Ernest, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economic Papers 5, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.

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    Economics and Finance; Research Methods;

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