IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pzh727.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Shuang Zhang

Personal Details

First Name:Shuang
Middle Name:
Last Name:Zhang
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pzh727
http://spot.colorado.edu/~shzh6533/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Colorado

Boulder, Colorado (United States)
http://www.colorado.edu/Economics/

: 303-492-6394
303-492-8960
Campus Box 256, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0256
RePEc:edi:decolus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Juan Carlos Suárez Serrato & Xiao Yu Wang & Shuang Zhang, 2016. "The Limits of Meritocracy: Screening Bureaucrats Under Imperfect Verifiability," NBER Working Papers 21963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Koichiro Ito & Shuang Zhang, 2016. "Willingness to Pay for Clean Air: Evidence from Air Purifier Markets in China," NBER Working Papers 22367, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Douglas Almond & Hongbin Li & Shuang Zhang, 2013. "Land Reform and Sex Selection in China," NBER Working Papers 19153, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Juan Carlos Suárez Serrato & Xiao Yu Wang & Shuang Zhang, 2016. "The Limits of Meritocracy: Screening Bureaucrats Under Imperfect Verifiability," NBER Working Papers 21963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Monica Martinez-Bravo & Gerard Padró I Miquel & Nancy Qian & Yang Yao, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of Local Elections in China: Theory and Empirical Evidence on the Autocrat's Trade-off," NBER Working Papers 24032, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Koichiro Ito & Shuang Zhang, 2016. "Willingness to Pay for Clean Air: Evidence from Air Purifier Markets in China," NBER Working Papers 22367, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Tong Liu & Guojun He & Alexis Lau, 2018. "Avoidance behavior against air pollution: evidence from online search indices for anti-PM2.5 masks and air filters in Chinese cities," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 20(2), pages 325-363, April.
    2. Berry, James & Fischer, Greg & Guiteras, Raymond, 2015. "Eliciting and Utilizing Willingness to Pay: Evidence from Field Trials in Northern Ghana," CEPR Discussion Papers 10703, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Richard Freeman & Wenquan Liang & Ran Song & Christopher Timmins, 2017. "Willingness to Pay for Clean Air in China," NBER Working Papers 24157, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Olivier Deschenes & Michael Greenstone & Joseph S. Shapiro, 2017. "Defensive Investments and the Demand for Air Quality: Evidence from the NOx Budget Program," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2086, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    5. Thomas Stoerk, 2017. "Compliance, Efficiency and Instrument Choice: Evidence from air pollution control in China," GRI Working Papers 273, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    6. Shuai Chen & Paulina Oliva & Peng Zhang, 2017. "The Effect of Air Pollution on Migration: Evidence from China," NBER Working Papers 24036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Douglas Almond & Hongbin Li & Shuang Zhang, 2013. "Land Reform and Sex Selection in China," NBER Working Papers 19153, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. David Howden & Yang Zhou, 2014. "China's One-Child Policy: Some Unintended Consequences," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 353-369, October.
    2. Zhiming Cheng & Russell Smyth, 2017. "China’S Imbalanced Sex Ratio And Satisfaction With Marriage," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 62(04), pages 765-782, September.
    3. Daniel Goodkind, 2017. "The Astonishing Population Averted by China’s Birth Restrictions: Estimates, Nightmares, and Reprogrammed Ambitions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(4), pages 1375-1400, August.
    4. Francisco J. Pino & Dilip Mookherjee & Abhishek Chakravarty & Sonia Bhalotra, 2016. "Property Rights and Gender Bias: Evidence from Land Reform in West Bengal," Working Papers id:10888, eSocialSciences.
    5. Anukriti, S & Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Tam, Hiu, 2016. "On the Quantity and Quality of Girls: New Evidence on Abortion, Fertility, and Parental Investments," IZA Discussion Papers 10271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Du, Julan & Wang, Yongqin & Zhang, Yan, 2015. "Sex imbalance, marital matching and intra-household bargaining: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 197-218.
    7. Samuel Marden, 2016. "Family Size and the Demand for Sex Selection: Evidence From China," Working Paper Series 09016, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    8. Xiaobo Peng & Dalton Conley, 2016. "The implication of health insurance for child development and maternal nutrition: evidence from China," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(5), pages 521-534, June.
    9. Li, Wenchao & Yi, Junjian, 2015. "The Competitive Earning Incentive for Sons: Evidence from Migration in China," IZA Discussion Papers 9214, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Anukriti, S & Kumler, Todd J., 2014. "Tariffs, Social Status, and Gender in India," IZA Discussion Papers 7969, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Howden, David & Zhou, Yang, 2015. "Why Did China’s Population Grow So Quickly?," MPRA Paper 79795, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Howden, David & Zhou, Yang, 2014. "Unintended Consequences of China´s One-Child Policy," MPRA Paper 79607, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Zhiming Cheng & Russell Smyth, 2015. "China’s Imbalanced Sex Ratio and Satisfaction with Marital Relationships," Monash Economics Working Papers 22-15, Monash University, Department of Economics.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (3) 2013-06-24 2016-03-29 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CNA: China (2) 2013-06-24 2016-03-29. Author is listed
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  4. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  5. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-06-24. Author is listed
  6. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2013-06-24. Author is listed
  7. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2016-07-09. Author is listed
  8. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2016-07-09. Author is listed

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Shuang Zhang should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.