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Stephen Rubb

Personal Details

First Name:Stephen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rubb
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pru217
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

John F. Welch College of Business
Sacred Heart University

Fairfield, Connecticut (United States)
http://business.sacredheart.edu/

(203) 371-7880

5151 Park Avenue, Fairfield, Connecticut 06825-1000
RePEc:edi:sbschus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Stephen Rubb, 2013. "Overeducation, undereducation and asymmetric information in occupational mobility," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(6), pages 741-751, February.
  2. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2011. "Spouse Overeducation and Family Migration: Evidence from the US," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 36-45, March.
  3. Stephen Rubb, 2009. "Over education among older workers: impact on wages and early retirement decisions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(16), pages 1621-1626.
  4. Quinn, Michael A. & Rubb, Stephen, 2006. "Mexico's labor market: The importance of education-occupation matching on wages and productivity in developing countries," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 147-156, April.
  5. Stephen Rubb, 2006. "Educational Mismatches and Earnings: Extensions of Occupational Mobility Theory and Evidence of Human Capital Depreciation," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 135-154.
  6. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2005. "The importance of education-occupation matching in migration decisions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 153-167, February.
  7. Stephen Rubb, 2005. "Overeducation, undereducation, and the theory of career mobility: a comment and a note on underemployment," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 115-118.
  8. Rubb, S., 2003. "Overeducation in the labor market: a comment and re-analysis of a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 621-629, December.
  9. Rubb, Stephen, 2003. "Overeducation: a short or long run phenomenon for individuals?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 389-394, August.
  10. Stephen Rubb, 2003. "Social Security's Earnings Test Penalty and the Employment Rates of Elderly Men Aged 65 to 69," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 415-431, Summer.
  11. Stephen Rubb, 2003. "Post-College Schooling, Overeducation, and Hourly Earnings in the United States," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 53-72.
  12. Stephen Rubb, 2002. "US Social Security rules in the 1990s: a natural experiment in myopic and farsighted behaviour," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(10), pages 637-640.

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