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Lynn Gambin

Personal Details

First Name:Lynn
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gambin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pga360
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/people/gambin
Terminal Degree: Department of Economics and Related Studies; University of York (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) University of Warwick, Institute for Employment Research

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ier/
Coventry, UK

(1%) Health, Econometrics and Data Group
University of York

York, United Kingdom
http://www.york.ac.uk/res/herc/research/hedg/

:


RePEc:edi:hedyouk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Lynn M Gambin, 2005. "The impact of health on wages in Europe – does gender matter?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 05/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

Articles

  1. Lynn Gambin & Terence Hogarth, 2016. "Counting the cost, reconciling the benefits: understanding employer investment in Higher Apprenticeships in accounting," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(5), pages 502-518, September.
  2. Terence Hogarth & Lynn Gambin, 2014. "Employer investment in Apprenticeships in England: an exploration of the sensitivity of employers in the construction sector to the net costs of training," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(9), pages 845-856, September.
  3. Andrew M. Jones & Eddy van Doorslaer & Teresa Bago d'Uva & Silvia Balia & Lynn Gambin & Cristina Hernández Quevedo & Xander Koolman & Nigel Rice, 2006. "Health and Wealth: Empirical Findings and Political Consequences," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(s1), pages 93-112, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Lynn M Gambin, 2005. "The impact of health on wages in Europe – does gender matter?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 05/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew M. Jones & Eddy van Doorslaer & Teresa Bago d'Uva & Silvia Balia & Lynn Gambin & Cristina Hernández Quevedo & Xander Koolman & Nigel Rice, 2006. "Health and Wealth: Empirical Findings and Political Consequences," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(s1), pages 93-112, May.
    2. Robert Jäckle & Oliver Himmler, 2010. "Health and Wages: Panel Data Estimates Considering Selection and Endogeneity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
    3. Oliver Fritz & Peter Mayerhofer & Reinhard Haller & Gerhard Streicher & Florian Bachner & Herwig Ostermann, 2013. "The Regional Economic Impacts of Austrian Hospitals," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 46672.
    4. Maite Blázquez & Elena Cottini & Ainhoa Herrarte, 2014. "The socioeconomic gradient in health: how important is material deprivation?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 239-264, June.

Articles

  1. Lynn Gambin & Terence Hogarth, 2016. "Counting the cost, reconciling the benefits: understanding employer investment in Higher Apprenticeships in accounting," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(5), pages 502-518, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Apostolou, Barbara & Dorminey, Jack W. & Hassell, John M. & Rebele, James E., 2017. "Accounting education literature review (2016)," Journal of Accounting Education, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-31.

  2. Andrew M. Jones & Eddy van Doorslaer & Teresa Bago d'Uva & Silvia Balia & Lynn Gambin & Cristina Hernández Quevedo & Xander Koolman & Nigel Rice, 2006. "Health and Wealth: Empirical Findings and Political Consequences," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(s1), pages 93-112, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Hostenkamp, Gisela & Stolpe, Michael, 2006. "The health gradient and early retirement: Evidence from the German Socio-economic Panel," Kiel Working Papers 1305, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Lee, Miaw-Chwen & Jones, Andrew Michael, 2007. "Understanding differences in income-related health inequality between geographic regions in Taiwan using the SF-36," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(2-3), pages 186-195, October.

More information

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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