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Hans Christian Heinemeyer

Personal Details

First Name:Hans
Middle Name:Christian
Last Name:Heinemeyer
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phe180

Affiliation

Fachbereich Wirtschaftswissenschaft
Freie Universität Berlin

Berlin, Germany
http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/

(030) 838 2272
(030) 838 2129
Garystr. 21, 14195 Berlin (Dahlem)
RePEc:edi:fwfubde (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian & Schulze, Max Stephan & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? Exploring a Natural Experiment on Border Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Hans-Christian Heinemeyer & Max-Stephan Schulze & Nikolaus Wolf, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? The Effects of New Borders on Trade in Central Europe 1885-1933," CESifo Working Paper Series 2246, CESifo.
  3. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian, 2007. "The course of the great depression: a consistent business cycle dating approach," Discussion Papers 2007/14, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  4. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian, 2006. "The impact of new borders on trade: World War I and the economic disintegration of Central Europe," Discussion Papers 2006/14, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

Articles

  1. Wolf, Nikolaus & Schulze, Max-Stephan & Heinemeyer, Hans-Christian, 2011. "On the Economic Consequences of the Peace: Trade and Borders After Versailles," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 915-949, December.
  2. Hans Christian Heinemeyer, 2007. "The treatment effect of borders on trade. The great war and the disintegration of Central Europe," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 1(3), pages 177-210, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian & Schulze, Max Stephan & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? Exploring a Natural Experiment on Border Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Was Germany ever united? Evidence from Intra- and International Trade 1885 – 1933," Economic Research Papers 269882, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    2. Kathryn E. Gary & Cristina Victoria Radu, 2019. "The impact of border changes and protectionism on real wages in early modern Scania," Working Papers 0166, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Keller, Wolfgang & Shiue, Carol Hua, 2013. "The Trade Impact of the Zollverein," CEPR Discussion Papers 9387, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  2. Hans-Christian Heinemeyer & Max-Stephan Schulze & Nikolaus Wolf, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? The Effects of New Borders on Trade in Central Europe 1885-1933," CESifo Working Paper Series 2246, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Was Germany ever united? Evidence from Intra- and International Trade 1885 – 1933," Economic Research Papers 269882, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    2. Felbermayr, Gabriel & Gröschl, Jasmin, 2014. "Within U.S. trade and the long shadow of the american secession," Munich Reprints in Economics 20587, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    3. Gallego, Nuria & Llano, Carlos, 2014. "The Border Effect and the Non-Linear Relationship between Trade and Distance," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2014/06, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
    4. Carlos Llano‐Verduras & Asier Minondo & Francisco Requena‐Silvente, 2011. "Is the Border Effect an Artefact of Geographical Aggregation?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(10), pages 1771-1787, October.
    5. Asier Minondo, 2010. "Do industries' average firm size, productivity and skill-intensity explain the border effect?," Aussenwirtschaft, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research, vol. 65(4), pages 353-364, December.

Articles

  1. Wolf, Nikolaus & Schulze, Max-Stephan & Heinemeyer, Hans-Christian, 2011. "On the Economic Consequences of the Peace: Trade and Borders After Versailles," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 915-949, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Beestermöller, Matthias & Rauch, Ferdinand, 2018. "A Dissection of Trading Capital: Trade in the Aftermath of the Fall of the Iron Curtain," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(2), pages 358-393, June.
    2. Federico, Giovanni & Tena Junguito, Antonio, 2013. "The ripples of the Industrial revolution: exports, economic growth and regional integration in Italy in the early 19th century," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp13-02, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    3. Giovanni Federico & Antonio Tena-Junguito, 2014. "The ripples of the industrial revolution: exports, economic growth, and regional integration in Italy in the early nineteenth century," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 349-369.
    4. Polugodina, Maria & Grigoriadis, Theocharis, 2020. "East Prussia 2.0: Persistent regions, rising nations," Discussion Papers 2020/8, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    5. Huning, Thilo R. & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2016. "How England Unified Germany: Geography and the Rise of Prussia After 1815," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145725, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Jacint Balaguer & Jordi Ripollés, 2018. "Revisiting the importance of border effect in sub‐national regions. Evidence from a quasi‐experimental design," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 1113-1130, November.

  2. Hans Christian Heinemeyer, 2007. "The treatment effect of borders on trade. The great war and the disintegration of Central Europe," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 1(3), pages 177-210, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Volker Nitsch & Nikolaus Wolf, 2013. "Tear down this wall: on the persistence of borders in trade," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(1), pages 154-179, February.
    2. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian & Schulze, Max Stephan & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? Exploring a Natural Experiment on Border Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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