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James A. Dunlevy

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Personal Details

First Name:James
Middle Name:A.
Last Name:Dunlevy
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdu73
Email:
Homepage:http://www.sba.muohio.edu/dunlevja/
Postal Address:
Phone:
Location: Oxford, Ohio (United States)
Homepage: http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/departments/economics
Email:
Phone: 513-529-2836
Fax: 513-529-6992
Postal:
Handle: RePEc:edi:demohus (more details at EDIRC)
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  1. William K. Hutchinson & James A. Dunlevy, 2001. "The Pro-Trade Effect of Immigration on American Exports During Period 1870 to 1910," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0125, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  2. Dunlevy, James A. & Hutchinson, William K., 2001. "The Pro-Trade Effect of Immigration on American Exports During the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries," IZA Discussion Papers 375, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  1. James A. Dunlevy, 2006. "The Influence of Corruption and Language on the Protrade Effect of Immigrants: Evidence from the American States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 182-186, February.
  2. Donald Cymrot & James Dunlevy & William Even, 2001. "'Who's on first': an empirical test of the Coase Theorem in baseball," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(5), pages 593-603.
  3. Dunlevy, James A., 2001. "From Ellis Island to JFK. New York's Two Great Waves of Immigration. By Nancy Foner. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press; and New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000. Pp. x, 334. $29.95," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(01), pages 236-237, March.
  4. Dunlevy, James A. & Hutchinson, William K., 1999. "The Impact of Immigration on American Import Trade in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(04), pages 1043-1062, December.
  5. Raynold, Prosper & A. Dunlevy, James, 1998. "Aggregate Shocks and the Relationship between U.S. Business Cycle Fluctuations and Export Performance," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 13, pages 163-198.
  6. Dunlevy, James A, 1993. "Migrant Stock vs. Lagged Migrant Flow as a Determinant of Migrant Settlement: A Comment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 181-88, May.
  7. Dunlevy, James A. & Saba, Richard P., 1992. "The role of nationality-specific characteristics on the settlement patterns of late nineteenth century immigrants," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 228-249, April.
  8. Cymrot, Donald J & Dunlevy, James A, 1987. "Are Free Agents Perspicacious Peregrinators?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 50-58, February.
  9. Dunlevy, James A, 1985. "Econometric Issues in the Analysis of Executive Compensation: A Comment [The Effects of Regulation on Executive Compensation]," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 171-74, February.
  10. Dunlevy, James A & Bellante, Don, 1983. "Net Migration, Endogenous Incomes and the Speed of Adjustment to the North-South Differential," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(1), pages 66-75, February.
  11. Dunlevy, James A, 1980. "A Test of the Capacity Pressure Hypothesis within a Simultaneous Equations Model of Export Performance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(1), pages 131-35, February.
  12. Dunlevy, James A, 1980. "Nineteenth-Century European Immigration to the United States: Intended versus Lifetime Settlement Patterns," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 77-90, October.
  13. Dunlevy, James A & Yeager, James H, Jr, 1979. "Legislators as Taxicabs: A Reconsideration," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(2), pages 303-06, April.
  14. Dunlevy, James A. & Gemery, Henry A., 1978. "Economic Opportunity and the Responses of “Old” and “New” Migrants to the United States," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(04), pages 901-917, December.
  15. Dunlevy, James A & Gemery, Henry A, 1977. "British-Irish Settlement Patterns in the U.S.: The Role of Family and Friends," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 24(3), pages 257-63, November.
  16. Dunlevy, James A & Gemery, Henry A, 1977. "The Role of Migrant Stock and Lagged Migration in the Settlement Patterns of Nineteenth Century Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(2), pages 137-44, May.
1 paper by this author was announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2001-11-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2001-11-05. Author is listed

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