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Pathways to Change: Case Studies of Strategic Negotiations


  • Joel E. cutcher-Gershenfeld

    (Michigan State University)

  • Robert B. McKersie


  • Richard E. Walton

    (Harvard University)


The authors identify and analyze the strategies for change and techniques most often used in today's labor negotiations. Nearly gone, they say, is the traditional "arms length" approach used by negotiators in the past. Instead, modern collective bargaining is characterized mainly by divergent strategies the authors characterize as either "forcing" (highly contentious) or "fostering" (highly cooperative). A dozen detailed case studies from a variety of industries are presented that show when, why and how these strategies are used, by whom, and to what result.

Suggested Citation

  • Joel E. cutcher-Gershenfeld & Robert B. McKersie & Richard E. Walton, 1995. "Pathways to Change: Case Studies of Strategic Negotiations," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pc, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:pc Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jorgenson, Dale W, 1988. "Productivity and Postwar U.S. Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 23-41, Fall.
    2. Theodore W. Schultz, 1956. "Reflections on Agricultural Production, Output and Supply," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 38(3), pages 748-762.
    3. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mahesh Nagarajan & Yehuda Bassok, 2008. "A Bargaining Framework in Supply Chains: The Assembly Problem," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 54(8), pages 1482-1496, August.
    2. Nagarajan, Mahesh & Sosic, Greys, 2008. "Game-theoretic analysis of cooperation among supply chain agents: Review and extensions," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 187(3), pages 719-745, June.

    More about this item


    collective bargaining; labor-management relations; union-management relations; unions; negotiations;

    JEL classification:

    • J5 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining


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