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Fertility and the Male Life Cycle in the Era of Fertility Decline

Editor

Listed:
  • Bledsoe, Caroline
    (Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois)

  • Lerner, Susana
    (El Colegio de Mexico)

  • Guyer, Jane
    (Northwestern University)

Abstract

This volume challenges the orthodox position on two of the main themes in fertility transition studies: the inevitable link between fewer children and quality of life and the focus on women as the sole important objects of study. In an era of unprecedented fertility decline, there is increasing concern about the lessening worldwide role that men play in the upbringing of children. The immense worldwide variation in the timing and sequencing of a man's life course events, the rise and fall in personal forunes, and the weight of society's hierarchies, all combine to affect the number of children a man fathers, when he fathers them, the number of partners he fathers them with, and the kind of support and recognition he bestows on them. The cross-disciplinary approach favoured here, including ethnographies, national surveys, and historical texts, avoids the narrow focus of many fertility studies texts. By providing detailed studies on a variety of countries ranging from Germany to Papua New Guinea, the contributors build an accurate picture of the global situation, while two Overview chapters give a wider perspective, and the Introduction synthesizes the themes identified and conclusions reached.

Suggested Citation

  • Bledsoe, Caroline & Lerner, Susana & Guyer, Jane (ed.), 2000. "Fertility and the Male Life Cycle in the Era of Fertility Decline," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294443.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198294443
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    Cited by:

    1. David Alich, 2007. "Differences between male and female fertility in Russia: an evaluation of basic pattern and data quality using the first wave of the Russian GGS," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-015, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2009. "Education, Work and Parenthood: Comparing the Experience of Young Men and Women in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 32-42, March.
    3. Li Zhang, 2008. "Religious affiliation, religiosity, and male and female fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(8), pages 233-262, April.

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