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Financing Local Government in the People's Republic of China

Editor

Listed:
  • Wong, Christine P. W.
    (Asian Development Bank)

Abstract

This study focuses on the status of local government finance at the subprovincial level. Fiscal reforms over the past decade have not kept pace with the rapid changes in demand for government services at lower levels. This book examines the composition of revenue and expenditure at city, country, and township levels, and provides recommendations.

Suggested Citation

  • Wong, Christine P. W. (ed.), 1997. "Financing Local Government in the People's Republic of China," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195900279.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195900279
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    Cited by:

    1. Yingyi Qian, 2002. "How Reform Worked in China," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 473, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Jin, Hehui & Qian, Yingyi & Weingast, Barry R., 2005. "Regional decentralization and fiscal incentives: Federalism, Chinese style," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(9-10), pages 1719-1742, September.
    3. Richard Bird & Christine C.P.Wong, 2005. "China's Fiscal System: A Work in Progress (2005)," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0520, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    4. Hehui Jin & Yingyi Qian, "undated". "Public vs. Private Ownership of Firms: Evidence from Rural China," Working Papers 97047, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    5. Qian, Yingyi, 2002. "How Reform Worked in China," CEPR Discussion Papers 3447, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Chien-Hsun Chen, 2004. "Fiscal decentralization, collusion and government size in China's transitional economy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(11), pages 699-705.
    7. Christine C.P. Wong & Richard M. Bird, 2005. "China?s Fiscal System: A Work in Progress," International Tax Program Papers 0515, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.

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