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From Domestic Manufacture to Industrial Revolution: The Case of the Rhineland Textile Districts

Author

Listed:
  • Kisch, Herbert

    (Michigan State University)

Abstract

This book is an economic, historical, and sociological examination of rural textile industries in the Lower Rhineland beginning in the sixteenth century and culminating with the age of factory organization in the early 1800s. Drawing on archival sources not available to English language readers, Kisch analyses the evolution of entrepreneurial innovations, the growth of a skilled labour force, and changes in institutional mechanisms and patterns of social behaviour that prepared this critical economic region for the innovation of factory production that came with the industrial revolution.

Suggested Citation

  • Kisch, Herbert, 1989. "From Domestic Manufacture to Industrial Revolution: The Case of the Rhineland Textile Districts," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195051117.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195051117
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    Cited by:

    1. R. C. Nash, 2010. "South Carolina indigo, European textiles, and the British Atlantic economy in the eighteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 362-392, May.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Davide Cantoni & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2011. "The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3286-3307, December.
    3. Giampaolo Lecce & Laura Ogliari, 2015. "Institutional Transplant and Cultural Proximity: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia," CESifo Working Paper Series 5652, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2014. "The Economics of Guilds," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 169-192, Fall.
    5. Cohen, Stephen & Fields, Gary, 1998. "Social Capital and Capital Gains, or Virtual Bowling in Silicon Valley," UCAIS Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, Working Paper Series qt200968vh, UCAIS Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, UC Berkeley.
    6. Kopsidis, Michael & Bromley, Daniel W., 2014. "The French Revolution and German industrialization: The new institutional economics rewrites history," IAMO Discussion Papers 149, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).

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