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Impact of climate change and bioenergy on nutrition


  • Cohen, Marc J.
  • Tirado, Cristina
  • Aberman, Noora-Lisa
  • Thompson, Brian


Food security has deteriorated since 1995 and reductions in child malnutrition are proceeding too slowly to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for halving hunger by 2015. Three major challenges threaten to drastically complicate efforts to overcome food insecurity and malnutrition: climate change, the growing use of food crops as a source of fuel and soaring food prices. Food security has four dimensions: food availability, access to food, stability of supply and access and safe and healthy food utilization. It is a key factor in good nutrition, along with health, sanitation and care practices. Globally, one billion people are currently without access to safe water and over 2 billion lack adequate sanitation facilities. Present global food supplies are more than adequate to provide everyone with all the needed calories, if the food were equally distributed. But over 820 million people in developing countries have calorie-deficient diets; over 60 percent live in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

Suggested Citation

  • Cohen, Marc J. & Tirado, Cristina & Aberman, Noora-Lisa & Thompson, Brian, 2008. "Impact of climate change and bioenergy on nutrition," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number Climate:2008, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprib:climate:2008

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Matin Qaim & Alain de Janvry, 2003. "Genetically Modified Crops, Corporate Pricing Strategies, and Farmers' Adoption: The Case of Bt Cotton in Argentina," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(4), pages 814-828.
    2. Matin Qaim & Arjunan Subramanian & Gopal Naik & David Zilberman, 2006. "Adoption of Bt Cotton and Impact Variability: Insights from India," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(1), pages 48-58.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kuchler, Magdalena, 2010. "Unravelling the argument for bioenergy production in developing countries: A world-economy perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 1336-1343, April.
    2. Kuchler, Magdalena & Linnér, Björn-Ola, 2012. "Challenging the food vs. fuel dilemma: Genealogical analysis of the biofuel discourse pursued by international organizations," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 581-588.
    3. Kuchler, Magdalena, 2014. "Sweet dreams (are made of cellulose): Sociotechnical imaginaries of second-generation bioenergy in the global debate," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 431-437.


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