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Corruption, Grabbing and Development


  • Tina Søreide
  • Aled Williams


All societies develop their own norms about what is fair behaviour and what is not. Violations of these norms, including acts of corruption, can collectively be described as forms of ‘grabbing’. This unique volume addresses how grabbing hinders development at the sector level and in state administration. The contributors – researchers and practitioners who work on the ground in developing countries – present empirical data on the mechanisms at play and describe different types of unethical practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Tina Søreide & Aled Williams (ed.), 2013. "Corruption, Grabbing and Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15297.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:15297

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Walsh, Cliff & Tisdell, Clem, 1973. "Non-marginal Externalities: As Relevant and As Not," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 49(127), pages 447-455, September.
    2. Boscolo, Marco & Vincent, Jeffrey R., 2003. "Nonconvexities in the production of timber, biodiversity, and carbon sequestration," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 251-268, September.
    3. Tisdell, Clem, 1970. "On the Theory of Externalities," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 46(113), pages 14-25, March.
    4. Jeffrey R. Vincent & Clark S. Binkley, 1993. "Efficient Multiple-Use Forestry May Require Land-Use Specialization," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 69(4), pages 370-376.
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    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS


    Development Studies; Economics and Finance; Law - Academic; Politics and Public Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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