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Hungary: An Economy in Transition

Author

Listed:
  • Szekely,Istvan
  • Newbery,David M. G.

Abstract

The economic transformation of Hungary has reached a critical stage. Hungary has succeeded in attracting foreign capital, and has achieved its first current account surplus in convertible currency since 1984, despite upheavals, but the privatization process has reached a crucial stage. It is clear that it will be a lengthy and difficult process, with significant repercussions for the future of the economy and profound social and welfare consequences. This book presents some of the local arguments and perceptions informing the debate, and critical examination of these ideas from an international panel of scholars. The chapters address privatization; financial, tax and legal systems; integration into the international financial and monetary systems; labour markets, unemployment and the social safety net; and the political economy of the current economic transformation.

Suggested Citation

  • Szekely,Istvan & Newbery,David M. G., 2008. "Hungary: An Economy in Transition," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521057547, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521057547
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Coase, R H, 1976. "Adam Smith's Views of Man," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(3), pages 529-546, October.
    2. Conybeare, John A C & Murdoch, James C & Sandler, Todd, 1994. "Alternative Collective-Goods Models of Military Alliances: Theory and Empirics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 525-542, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kate Bishop & Igor Filatotchev & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2002. "Endogenous ownership structure: factors affecting the post-privatisation equity in largest Hungarian firms," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 5, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).
    2. Franz, Wolfgang, 1994. "Central and East European labor markets in transition: Developments, causes, and cures," Discussion Papers 19, University of Konstanz, Center for International Labor Economics (CILE).
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1718-:d:113077 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bruce Headey & Rudolph Andorka & Peter Krause, 1995. "Political legitimacy versus economic imperatives in system transformation: Hungary and East Germany 1990–93," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 247-273, November.
    5. Simonovits, András, 1998. "Az új magyar nyugdíjrendszer és problémái
      [The new Hungarian pension system and its problems]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 689-708.
    6. Raiser, Martin, 1993. "Governing the transition to a market economy," Kiel Working Papers 592, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. Andras Simonovits, 2009. "Hungarian Pension System and its Reform," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0908, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    8. Brauer, Holger & Falk, Martin & Raiser, Martin, 1996. "Labour markets in Poland and Hungary five years from the start of transition: Evidence from monthly data," Kiel Working Papers 742, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

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