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"Wir Beniner sind keine Deutschen" - Zur soziokulturellen Problematik der Zusammenarbeit mit Partnerfachkräften in Benin


  • Kohnert, Dirk
  • Preuß, Hans-Joachim A.


Häufig wird erst bei der Schlußevaluierung von TZ-Projekten erkannt, daß das Nichterreichen von Teilzielen oder gar das Scheitern des gesamten Projektes auf die mangelnde Berücksichtigung sozialer und soziokultureller Voraussetzungen zurückzuführen sind. Es reicht nicht aus, technische, ökonomische und organisatorische, am europäischen Modell orientierte Ansätze modifiziert zu übertragen. Ausgehend von ökologischen, ökonomischen, sozialen, politischen und kulturellen Rahmenbedingungen müssen angemessene Problemlösungen gemeinsam mit den Zielgruppen entwickelt und umgesetzt werden. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob das Instrumentarium der GTZ mit der Bevorzugung der Projektabwicklung über staatliche Träger dieser Aufgabe gerecht werden kann.

Suggested Citation

  • Kohnert, Dirk & Preuß, Hans-Joachim A., 1989. ""Wir Beniner sind keine Deutschen" - Zur soziokulturellen Problematik der Zusammenarbeit mit Partnerfachkräften in Benin," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 20-21.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:espost:118680

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul Schultz, T., 2002. "Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 207-225, February.
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    6. Harsha Aturupane & Paul Glewwe & Suzanne Wisniewski, 2013. "The impact of school quality, socioeconomic factors, and child health on students’ academic performance: evidence from Sri Lankan primary schools," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 2-37, February.
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    More about this item


    development cooperation; development aid; development planning; Benin; West Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • F54 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Colonialism; Imperialism; Postcolonialism
    • F68 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Policy
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O29 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Other
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes


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