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The Roles of Openness and Labor Market Institutions for Employment Dynamics during Economic Crises

  • Gamberoni, Elisa


    (World Bank)

  • Von Uexkull, Erik

    (International Labour Office)

  • Weber, Sebastian

Employment effects of the recent global economic crisis have differed significantly across countries. An active public debate currently focuses on external shocks and the role of labor market policies as a driver of those differences. In this note, we analyze the roles of integration into the global economy and different labor market institutions during different phases of past global economic downturns and domestic banking and debt crises. We find that domestic debt and banking crises were much more severe in their impact on employment than were global economic downturns. On average, the reduction in employment growth was more than twice as strong. We also find that openness to trade has both deepened the contractionary effects on employment and allowed for a faster recovery. High severance pay dampened the employment effect in both domestic crises and global economic downturns, whereas very high unemployment benefits were associated with stronger reductions in employment growth.

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Article provided by The World Bank in its journal Economic Premise.

Volume (Year): (2010)
Issue (Month): 29 (August)
Pages: 1-5

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Handle: RePEc:wbk:prmecp:ep29
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  1. Fabian Valencia & Luc Laeven, 2008. "Systemic Banking Crises; A New Database," IMF Working Papers 08/224, International Monetary Fund.
  2. M Arellano & O Bover, 1990. "Another Look at the Instrumental Variable Estimation of Error-Components Models," CEP Discussion Papers dp0007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Iacovone, Leonardo & Zavacka, Veronika, 2009. "Banking crises and exports : lessons from the past," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5016, The World Bank.
  4. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
  5. Zanetti, Francesco, 2011. "Labor market institutions and aggregate fluctuations in a search and matching model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(5), pages 644-658, June.
  6. Alessia Campolmi & Ester Faia, 2011. "Labor market institutions and inflation volatility in the euro area," Post-Print hal-00796300, HAL.
  7. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-26, November.
  8. Nicolas Berman, 2009. "Financial Crises and International Trade: The Long Way to Recovery," Economics Working Papers ECO2009/23, European University Institute.
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