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Worker Reputation and Productivity Incentives


  • Aron, Debra J


This paper examines firms' problems of how to motivate risk-averse workers not to shirk whe n workers' utility functions are unknown. The problem is studied in a two-period setting in which a worker's actions today can influence n ot only his compensation today but the firms' beliefs about his prefe rences. Firms cannot credibly commit to ignore the revealed informati on, so workers' actions today affect their future compensation contra cts. It is shown that, in the Wilson-Miyazaki equilibrium, firms may pool workers and learn about their types gradually over time rather t han inducing them to separate and reveal their types immediately. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Aron, Debra J, 1987. "Worker Reputation and Productivity Incentives," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(4), pages 87-106, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:4:p:s87-106

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Masanori Hashimoto & Ben T. Yu, 1980. "Specific Capital, Employmemt Contracts, and Wage Rigidity," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 11(2), pages 536-549, Autumn.
    2. Hall, Robert E & Lazear, Edward P, 1984. "The Excess Sensitivity of Layoffs and Quits to Demand," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(2), pages 233-257, April.
    3. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 1-9.
    4. Hayes, Beth, 1984. "Unions and Strikes with Asymmetric Information," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(1), pages 57-83, January.
    5. Harris Milton & Townsend, Robert M, 1981. "Resource Allocation under Asymmetric Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(1), pages 33-64, January.
    6. Fama, Eugene F, et al, 1969. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to New Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-21, February.
    7. Christopher J. Flinn & James J. Heckman, 1982. "Models for the Analysis of Labor Force Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 0857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. repec:fth:prinin:147 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jarrell, Gregg A, 1981. "The Economic Effects of Federal Regulation of the Market for New Security Issues," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 613-675, December.
    10. John G. Cragg & Russell S. Uhler, 1970. "The Demand for Automobiles," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 3(3), pages 386-406, August.
    11. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
    12. Michael G. Abbott, 1982. "Specification Tests of Quarterly Econometric Models of Aggregate Strike Frequency in Canada," Working Papers 527, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    13. repec:pri:indrel:dsp01k0698750j is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Kimiko Terai & Amihai Glazer, 2014. "Budgets under Delegation," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2014-007, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
    2. Hans Gersbach & Amihai Glazer, 2009. "High Compensation Creates a Ratchet Effect," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(539), pages 1208-1224, July.
    3. Botond Koszegi & Wei Li, 2002. "Ambition and Talent," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0214, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    4. Gibbons, Robert & Murphy, Kevin J, 1992. "Optimal Incentive Contracts in the Presence of Career Concerns: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(3), pages 468-505, June.
    5. David E. M. Sappington, 1991. "Incentives in Principal-Agent Relationships," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 45-66, Spring.
    6. C. Stowe, 2009. "Incorporating morale into a classical agency model: implications for incentives, effort, and organization," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 147-164, April.
    7. Kimiko Terai & Amihai Glazer, 2015. "Principal-Agent Problems When Principal Allocates a Budget," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2015-012, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
    8. Daniel R. Vincent, 1989. "Bilateral Monopoly, Non-durable Goods and Dynamic Trading Relationships," Discussion Papers 832, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

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