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The Tournament Careers of Top-Ranked Men and Women Tennis Professionals: Are the Gentlemen More Committed than the Ladies?




We ask whether top-ranked male tennis professionals are more dedicated or committed to their careers than the top-ranked female professionals. We find no evidence that this is the case in the 1979-1994 period. Despite substantially lower real earnings, the women pros competed for as many years as did the men and just as intensely in terms of annual number of tournaments played.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas Coate & Donijo Robbins, 2001. "The Tournament Careers of Top-Ranked Men and Women Tennis Professionals: Are the Gentlemen More Committed than the Ladies?," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(1), pages 185-193, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:tra:jlabre:v:22:y:2001:i:1:p:185-193

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Frick, Bernd, 2011. "Gender differences in competitiveness: Empirical evidence from professional distance running," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 389-398, June.
    2. Che, XiaoGang & Humphreys, Brad, 2012. "Earnings and Performance in Women's Professional Alpine Skiing," Working Papers 2012-22, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    3. XiaoGang Che & Brad R. Humphreys, 2013. "Earnings and performance in women’s skiing," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 6, pages 115-131 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Ryan Rodenberg & Daniel Stone, 2011. "The Short and Long-Run Labor Market Effects of Age Eligibility Rules: Evidence from Women’s Professional Tennis," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 181-198, June.
    5. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2012. "Evaluating professional tennis players’ career performance: A Data Envelopment Analysis approach," MPRA Paper 41516, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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