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Ex-dividend Day Share Price Behavior: Effects of the Tax Reform Act of 1986


  • Lamdin, Douglas J
  • Hiemstra, Craig


The authors examine ex-dividend day share price behavior in light of the Tax Reform Act of 1986. Data from 1982 through 1991 are examined. The evidence generally supports the traditional view that differential taxation does affect the valuation of dividends and capital gains rather than the tax irrelevance view that it does not. Copyright 1993 by MIT Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Lamdin, Douglas J & Hiemstra, Craig, 1993. "Ex-dividend Day Share Price Behavior: Effects of the Tax Reform Act of 1986," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(4), pages 778-783, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:75:y:1993:i:4:p:778-83

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Quah, Danny, 1990. "Permanent and Transitory Movements in Labor Income: An Explanation for "Excess Smoothness" in Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(3), pages 449-475, June.
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    11. Alan J. Auerbach & Kevin Hassett, 1991. "Corporate Savings and Shareholder Consumption," NBER Chapters,in: National Saving and Economic Performance, pages 75-102 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Newey, Whitney & West, Kenneth, 2014. "A simple, positive semi-definite, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation consistent covariance matrix," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 33(1), pages 125-132.
    13. Phillips, P C B, 1987. "Time Series Regression with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 277-301, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonie Bell & Tim Jenkinson, 2002. "New Evidence of the Impact of Dividend Taxation and on the Identity of the Marginal Investor," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(3), pages 1321-1346, June.
    2. Milonas, Nikolaos T. & Travlos, Nickolaos G. & Xiao, Jason Zezhong & Tan, Cunkai, 2006. "The ex-dividend day stock price behavior in the Chinese stock market," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 155-174, April.
    3. Yishuang Xu & Chung Yim Yiu, 2017. "The Impacts of Tax Reforms on REITs. An International Empirical Study," Academic Journal of Economic Studies, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 3(1), pages 11-22, March.
    4. Ravinder K. Bhardwaj & LeRoy D. Brooks, 1999. "Further Evidence On Dividend Yields And The Ex-Dividend Day Stock Price Effect," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 22(4), pages 503-514, December.
    5. Harris, Trevor S. & Hubbard, R. Glenn & Kemsley, Deen, 2001. "The share price effects of dividend taxes and tax imputation credits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 569-596, March.

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