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A Labor Supply Model for Secondary Workers

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  • Wachter, Michael L

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  • Wachter, Michael L, 1972. "A Labor Supply Model for Secondary Workers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 54(2), pages 141-151, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:54:y:1972:i:2:p:141-51
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    Cited by:

    1. Ángel L. Martín‐Román & Jaime Cuéllar‐Martín & Alfonso Moral, 2020. "Labor supply and the business cycle: The “bandwagon worker effect”," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(6), pages 1607-1642, December.
    2. Arthur Kraft, 1973. "Preference Orderings As Determinants Of The Labor Force Behavior Of Married Women," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(3), pages 270-284, September.
    3. Goodstein, Eban, 2002. "Labor supply and the double-dividend," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 101-106, August.
    4. Ray C. Fair & Diane J. Macunovich, 1996. "Explaining the Labor Force Participation of Women 20-24," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1116, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    5. Michael L. Wachter & Choongsoo Kim, 1979. "Time Series Changes in Youth Joblessness," NBER Working Papers 0384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Martín-Román, Ángel L., 2020. "Beyond the added-worker and the discouraged-worker effects: the entitled-worker effect," MPRA Paper 103973, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Richard Easterlin, 1978. "What will 1984 be like? Socioeconomic implications of recent twists in age structure," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(4), pages 397-432, November.
    8. Benati, Luca, 2001. "Some empirical evidence on the 'discouraged worker' effect," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 387-395, March.
    9. Cahit Guven & Bent Sørensen, 2012. "Subjective Well-Being: Keeping Up with the Perception of the Joneses," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 109(3), pages 439-469, December.
    10. Richard A. Easterlin & Victor R. Fuchs & Simon Kuznets, 1980. "American Population since 1940," NBER Chapters, in: The American Economy in Transition, pages 275-348, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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