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Matching Problems with Expertise in Firms and Markets


  • William Fuchs
  • Luis Garicano


When should expertise be shared in markets and when in firms? Knowledge exchanges in the market involve less information about the quality of the provider's expertise, but facilitate good utilization of experts' knowledge. In a firm, management holds soft information about individuals' expertise and thus improves on the matching of experts to problems; however, the usage of experts is not smooth and thus firms experience over- or underutilization of experts' time. Thus the trade-off between firms and markets is between utilization (the market allows for better, smoother, utilization of knowledge than firms) and the quality of matching between problems and problem solvers (the market provides less information about experts' quality). (JEL: D21, L22) (c) 2010 by the European Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • William Fuchs & Luis Garicano, 2010. "Matching Problems with Expertise in Firms and Markets," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(2-3), pages 354-364, 04-05.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:8:y:2010:i:2-3:p:354-364

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Simona Grassi & Ching-To Albert Ma, 2015. "Information Acquisition, Referral, and Organization," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series wp2015-007, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    2. William Fuchs & Luis Garicano & Luis Rayo, 2015. "Optimal Contracting and the Organization of Knowledge," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 632-658.
    3. Fabio Landini & Antonio Nicolò & Marco Piovesan, 2013. "The Hidden Cost of Specialization," IFRO Working Paper 2013/9, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    4. Larry G. Epstein & Hiroaki Kaido & Kyoungwon Seo, 2016. "Robust Confidence Regions for Incomplete Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 84, pages 1799-1838, September.
    5. Cécile Cezanne & Laurence Saglietto, 2016. "Human Capital-Intensive Firms and 4PLs: A Specific Partnership," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 12(1), pages 61-83, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure


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