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Bargaining and Cooperation in Strategic Form Games

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  • Sergiu Hart
  • Andreu Mas-Colell

Abstract

In this paper we view bargaining and cooperation as an interaction superimposed on a game in strategic form. A multistage bargaining procedure for N players, the "proposer commitment" procedure, is presented. It is inspired by Nash's two-player variable-threat model; a key feature is the commitment to "threats." We establish links to classical cooperative game theory solutions, such as the Shapley value in the transferable utility case. However, we show that even in standard pure exchange economies, the traditional coalitional function may not be adequate when utilities are not transferable. (JEL: C70, C71, C78, D70) (c) 2010 by the European Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergiu Hart & Andreu Mas-Colell, 2010. "Bargaining and Cooperation in Strategic Form Games," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 7-33, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:8:y:2010:i:1:p:7-33
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    Cited by:

    1. Françoise Forges & Roberto Serrano, 2013. "Cooperative Games With Incomplete Information: Some Open Problems," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(02), pages 1-17.
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/8158 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zhigang Cao, 2011. "Remarks on Bargaining and Cooperation in Strategic Form Games," Discussion Paper Series dp565, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
    4. Zhigang Cao, 2013. "Bargaining and cooperation in strategic form games with suspended realizations of threats," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 41(2), pages 337-358, July.
    5. Cao, Zhigang, 2013. "Equilibrium computation of the Hart and Mas-Colell bargaining model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 152-162.
    6. Valencia-Toledo, Alfredo & Vidal-Puga, Juan, 2017. "A sequential bargaining protocol for land rental arrangements," MPRA Paper 80424, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • C71 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Cooperative Games
    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General

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