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Presidential Address: How Revealing Is Revealed Preference?

Author

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  • Richard Blundell

    (University College London and Institute for Fiscal Studies,)

Abstract

This lecture address the following two key criticisms of the empirical application of revealed preference theory: When the RP conditions do not reject, they do not provide precise predictions; and when they do reject, they do not help characterize the nature of irrationality or the degree/direction of changing tastes. Recent developments in the application of RP theory are shown to have rendered these criticisms unfounded. A powerful test of rationality is available that also provides a natural characterization of changing tastes. Tight bounds on demand responses and on the welfare costs of relative price and tax changes are also available and are shown to work well in practice. (JEL: D11, D12, C14) Copyright (c) 2005 The European Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Blundell, 2005. "Presidential Address: How Revealing Is Revealed Preference?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 211-235, 04/05.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:3:y:2005:i:2-3:p:211-235
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sam Cosaert & Thomas Demuynck, "undated". "Nonparametric welfare and demand analysis with unobserved individual heterogeneity," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/251988, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Dietrich, Franz & List, Christian, 2016. "Reason-Based Choice And Context-Dependence: An Explanatory Framework," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(02), pages 175-229, July.
    3. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01249514 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Filistrucchi, L. & Geradin, D.A.A.G. & van Damme, E.E.C., 2012. "Identifying Two-Sided Markets," Discussion Paper 2012-008, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.
    5. Blundell, R. & Browning, M. & Cherchye, L.J.H. & Crawford, I. & de Rock, B. & Vermeulen, F.M.P., 2012. "Sharp for SARP : Nonparametric Bounds on the Behavioural and Welfare Effects of Price Changes," Discussion Paper 2012-065, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. Lombardi, Michele, 2010. "What kind of preference maximization does the weak axiom of revealed non-inferiority characterize?," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 323-325, May.
    7. Andreas Chai & Nicholas Rohde & Jacques Silber, 2015. "Measuring The Diversity Of Household Spending Patterns," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 423-440, July.
    8. Richard Blundell & Martin Browning & Laurens Cherchye & Ian Crawford & Bram De Rock & Frederic Vermeulen, 2015. "Sharp for SARP: Nonparametric Bounds on Counterfactual Demands," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 43-60, February.
    9. Walter Briec & Kristiaan Kerstens & Ignace Van de Woestyne, 2016. "Congestion in production correspondences," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 119(1), pages 65-90, September.
    10. Richard Blundell & Joel L. Horowitz & Matthias Parey, 2013. "Nonparametric estimation of a heterogeneous demand function under the Slutsky inequality restriction," CeMMAP working papers CWP54/13, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Jim Engle-Warnick & Natalia Mishagina, 2014. "Insensitivity to Prices in a Dictator Game," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-19, CIRANO.
    12. Dietrich, Franz & List, Christian, 2016. "Reason-Based Choice And Context-Dependence: An Explanatory Framework," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(02), pages 175-229, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General

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