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Thirty-Seven and Counting: How Has AEFP Evolved from Its Origins?

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  • Carolyn D. Herrington

    () (Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Florida State University)

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Suggested Citation

  • Carolyn D. Herrington, 2013. "Thirty-Seven and Counting: How Has AEFP Evolved from Its Origins?," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 1-13, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:edfpol:v:8:y:2013:i:1:p:1-13
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    File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/EDFP_a_00080
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. John Bound & Michael F. Lovenheim & Sarah Turner, 2010. "Why Have College Completion Rates Declined? An Analysis of Changing Student Preparation and Collegiate Resources," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 129-157, July.
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    8. Philippe Belley & Lance Lochner, 2007. "The Changing Role of Family Income and Ability in Determining Educational Achievement," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, pages 37-89.
    9. Barsky R. & Bound J. & Charles K.K. & Lupton J.P., 2002. "Accounting for the Black-White Wealth Gap: A Nonparametric Approach," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 97, pages 663-673, September.
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    11. Kevin Stange, 2012. "Ability Sorting and the Importance of College Quality to Student Achievement: Evidence from Community Colleges," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 7(1), pages 74-105, January.
    12. Caroline M. Hoxby, 1997. "How the Changing Market Structure of U.S. Higher Education Explains College Tuition," NBER Working Papers 6323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    14. Bound, John & Turner, Sarah, 2007. "Cohort crowding: How resources affect collegiate attainment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 877-899, June.
    15. Philippe Belley & Lance Lochner, 2007. "The Changing Role of Family Income and Ability in Determining Educational Achievement," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, pages 37-89.
    16. Meta Brown & John Karl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri, 2012. "A New Test of Borrowing Constraints for Education," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 511-538.
    17. Alfonso Flores-Lagunes & Audrey Light, 2010. "Interpreting Degree Effects in the Returns to Education," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
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    19. John Bound & Michael F. Lovenheim & Sarah Turner, 2012. "Increasing Time to Baccalaureate Degree in the United States," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, pages 375-424.
    20. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2009. "The Changing Selectivity of American Colleges," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(4), pages 95-118, Fall.
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    24. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith, 2006. "Estimating the Returns to College Quality with Multiple Proxies for Quality," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 701-728, July.
    25. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 2001. "The Effect of Parental Transfers and Borrowing Constraints on Educational Attainment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1051-1103, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dominic J. Brewer & Chandler P. Miranda, 2016. "AEFP at Forty: Looking Back and Thinking Forward," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 11(4), pages 361-368, Fall.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Association for Education Finance and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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