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Consumption Recovery and Economic Rebalancing in China

Author

Listed:
  • Yiping Huang

    () (China Center for Macroeconomic Research Peking University and Barclays)

  • Jian Chang

    () (Barclays Capital Asia Limited)

  • Lingxiu Yang

    () (Barclays Capital Asia Limited)

Abstract

Boosting consumption has been a policy strategy for rebalancing the Chinese economy. The official statistics, however, show persistently declining consumption as a share of GDP during the past decade. In this paper, we provide a more complete picture of Chinese consumption by piecing together data from official and unofficial sources. Our estimations suggest that the consumption share rebounded from 2008, after a period of decline. This may provide the first piece of evidence that the rebalancing of the Chinese economy is already under way as a result of changes in factor markets, especially rapid increase in labor income, that have resulted in increases in household income as a share of GDP and improvement in income distribution across households. © 2013 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Yiping Huang & Jian Chang & Lingxiu Yang, 2013. "Consumption Recovery and Economic Rebalancing in China," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 12(1), pages 47-67, Winter/Sp.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:asiaec:v:12:y:2013:i:1:p:47-67
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2016. "Contractions in Chinese Fertility and Savings: Long-run Domestic and Global Implications," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: Iris Day & John Simon (ed.),Structural Change in China: Implications for Australia and the World, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    2. Rod Tyers, 2016. "China and Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(11), pages 1674-1702, November.
    3. Tyers, Rod, 2015. "International effects of China's rise and transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian perspectives," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-19.
    4. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2018. "Fertility and savings contractions in China: Long‐run global implications," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(11), pages 3194-3220, November.
    5. Tian, Jing & Andraded, Celio & Lumbreras, Julio & Guan, Dabo & Wang, Fangzhi & Liao, Hua, 2018. "Integrating Sustainability Into City-level CO2 Accounting: Social Consumption Pattern and Income Distribution," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 1-16.
    6. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Real exchange rate determination and the China puzzle," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(2), pages 1-32, November.
    7. Rod Tyers, 2014. "Analysing the Short Run Effects of China’s Economic Reform Agenda," CAMA Working Papers 2014-29, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    8. Peng Bin & Andrea Fracasso, 2017. "Regional Consumption Inequality in China: An Oaxaca-Blinder Decomposition at the Prefectural Level," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 459-486, September.
    9. Rod Tyers, 2015. "Financial Integration and China's Global Impact," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 15-02, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    10. Paul De Grauwe & Zhaoyong Zhang & Rod Tyers, 2016. "Slower Growth and Vulnerability to Recession: Updating China's Global Impact," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(1), pages 66-88, February.
    11. Vipin Arora & Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Reconstructing the Savings Glut: The Global Implications of Asian Excess Saving," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 14-24, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    12. Chi-Wei Su & Xiao-Cui Yin & Ran Tao, 2018. "How do housing prices affect consumption in China? New evidence from a continuous wavelet analysis," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(9), pages 1-14, September.
    13. Andrea Fracasso, 2015. "Economic Rebalancing and Growth: the Japanese experience and China’s prospects," DEM Discussion Papers 2015/07, Department of Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption; economic rebalancing; China;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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