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Predictive validity of stated preference data: evidence from mountain bike park visits before and after trail system expansion

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  • Kevin Atkinson
  • John C. Whitehead

Abstract

This article investigates the validity of stated preference data for use in recreation demand estimation. We use stated preference and revealed preference data from users of a mountain bike park collected before and after an expansion of the trail system. The ex-ante stated preference data elicited before the change exhibits hypothetical bias, but it would provide useful information for demand prediction.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Atkinson & John C. Whitehead, 2015. "Predictive validity of stated preference data: evidence from mountain bike park visits before and after trail system expansion," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(9), pages 730-733, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:22:y:2015:i:9:p:730-733
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2014.972541
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Therese C. Grijalva & Robert P. Berrens & Alok K. Bohara & Paul M. Jakus & W. Douglass Shaw, 2002. "Valuing the Loss of Rock Climbing Access in Wilderness Areas: A National-Level, Random-Utility Model," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(1), pages 103-120.
    2. John C. Whitehead & Melissa S. Weddell & Peter A. Groothuis, 2016. "Mitigating Hypothetical Bias In Stated Preference Data: Evidence From Sports Tourism," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 605-611, January.
    3. Timothy C. Haab & Matthew G. Interis & Daniel R. Petrolia & John C. Whitehead, 2013. "From Hopeless to Curious? Thoughts on Hausman's "Dubious to Hopeless" Critique of Contingent Valuation," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 593-612.
    4. Jerry Hausman, 2012. "Contingent Valuation: From Dubious to Hopeless," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 43-56, Fall.
    5. John Loomis, 1993. "An investigation into the reliability of intended visitation behavior," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(2), pages 183-191, April.
    6. John Whitehead, 2005. "Environmental Risk and Averting Behavior: Predictive Validity of Jointly Estimated Revealed and Stated Behavior Data," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 32(3), pages 301-316, November.
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    JEL classification:

    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources

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