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An assessment into the characteristics of award winning papers at CHI

Author

Listed:
  • Omar Mubin

    (Western Sydney University)

  • Dhaval Tejlavwala

    (Western Sydney University)

  • Mudassar Arsalan

    (Western Sydney University)

  • Muneeb Ahmad

    (Western Sydney University)

  • Simeon Simoff

    (Western Sydney University)

Abstract

The overall readability of CHI publications is not known. In addition, little is understood about what lexical or demographic characteristics are unique to award winning papers at CHI and if they are significantly different from non award winning papers. We therefore carry out an exploration and assessment into the readability metrics as well as a meta analysis of 382 full papers and 54 notes from the 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 editions at CHI. Our results illustrate that notes did not have any significant trends whatsoever. On the other hand, award winning full papers were shown to have lower readability as compared to non award winning full papers. The type of research contribution played an important role; such that award winning full papers were significantly more likely to have a theoretical contribution as compared to non award winning full papers and full papers that presented an artifact as their contribution were more readable than other full papers. Our demographic analysis of authors indicated that the experience of authors nor their region of affiliation were not associated with the likelihood of their full paper being awarded. The experience of authors did not effect the overall readability of full papers however the region of affiliation did have a significant influence on the overall readability of full papers. In conclusion, we speculate on our obtained results through linkages with prior work in readability analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Omar Mubin & Dhaval Tejlavwala & Mudassar Arsalan & Muneeb Ahmad & Simeon Simoff, 2018. "An assessment into the characteristics of award winning papers at CHI," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 116(2), pages 1181-1201, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:116:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-018-2778-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-018-2778-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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