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Nocturia Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Compared with Other Common Chronic Diseases

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  • Paul S. J. Miller

    () (Miller Economics Ltd.)

  • Harry Hill

    (University of Manchester)

  • Fredrik L. Andersson

    (Ferring Pharmaceuticals A/S
    Linköping University)

Abstract

Objectives The International Continence Society defines nocturia as the need to void one or more times during the night, with each of the voids preceded and followed by sleep. The chronic sleep disturbance and sleep deprivation experienced by patients with nocturia affects quality of life, compromising both mental and physical well-being. This paper aims to characterise the burden of nocturia by comparing published data from patients with nocturia with data from patients with any of 12 other common chronic conditions, specifically focusing on its impact on work productivity and activity impairment, as measured by the instrument of the same name (WPAI). Methods A systematic literature review of multiple data sources identified evaluable studies for inclusion in the analysis. Study eligibility criteria included use of the WPAI instrument in patients with one of a predefined list of chronic conditions. We assessed the quality of each included study using the Newcastle–Ottawa scale and extracted basic study information, work and activity impairment data. To assess how work and activity impairment from nocturia compares with impairment from other common chronic diseases, we conducted two data syntheses (pooled and unpooled). Results The number of evaluable studies and the range of overall work productivity impairment reported, respectively, were as follows: nocturia (3; 14–39 %), overactive bladder (5; 11–41 %), irritable bowel syndrome/constipation (14; 21–51 %), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (13; 6–42 %), asthma/allergies (11; 6–40 %), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (7; 19–42 %), sleep problems (3; 12–37 %), arthritis (13; 21–69 %), pain (9; 29–64 %), depression (4; 15–43 %) and gout (2; 20–37 %). Conclusions The overall work productivity impairment as a result of nocturia is substantial and was found to be similar to impairment observed as a result of several other more frequently researched common chronic diseases. Greater awareness of the burden of nocturia, a highly bothersome and prevalent condition, will help policy makers and healthcare decision makers provide appropriate management of nocturia.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul S. J. Miller & Harry Hill & Fredrik L. Andersson, 2016. "Nocturia Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Compared with Other Common Chronic Diseases," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(12), pages 1277-1297, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:pharme:v:34:y:2016:i:12:d:10.1007_s40273-016-0441-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s40273-016-0441-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Kronborg & Gitte Handberg & Flemming Axelsen, 2009. "Health care costs, work productivity and activity impairment in non-malignant chronic pain patients," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(1), pages 5-13, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hafner, Marco & Yerushalmi, Erez & Andersson, Fredrik L. & Burtea, Teodor, 2020. "Quantifying the macroeconomic cost of night-time bathroom visits: an application to the UK," CAFE Working Papers 5, Centre for Applied Finance and Economics (CAFE), Birmingham City Business School, Birmingham City University.

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