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A conversation with Richard Easterlin

  • Diane J. Macunovich

    ()

    (Williams College, Department of Economics, Fernald House, Williamstown, MA 01267, USA)

After an introduction touching on various biographical highlights, this paper summarizes a wide-ranging discussion with Richard Easterlin which occurred in the Autumn of 1996. We considered the Easterlin Hypothesis - its genesis and current status, together with Easterlin`s views on attempts to develop measures of relative income - and then moved on to "The Fertility Revolution" and questions regarding the applicability of the theory of household choice in modernizing societies. This was followed by a discussion of his early career development and influences on him at that time, ending with ruminations regarding the current state of economics, and the validity of training given to young economists today. JEL classification: J10, J11, J13

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 10 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 119-136

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:2:p:119-136
Note: Received February 13, 1997 / Accepted February 26, 1997 received her PhD in economics in 1989 from the University of Southern California, where Easterlin was her primary advisor. Prior to her current career she worked as an economic and demographic consultant in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada, after having completed undergraduate work at MIT in 1966. She is currently an Associate Professor of Economics at Williams College in Massachusetts, where she is an avid student of economic and demographic feedback effects.
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