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Arrested development: the experience of European hard disk drive firms in comparison with US and Japanese firms

Author

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  • Henry Chesbrough

    () (Graduate School of Business Administration, Harvard University, Soldiers Field Road, Morgan Hall T61, Boston, 02163, USA)

Abstract

This paper analyses how US, Japanese, and European HDD firms responded to technological shifts in the hard disk industry from 1973 through 1996. Leading incumbent US HDD firms were frequently forced out of the market. Leading Japanese incumbent firms in the same industry, however, were not displaced by these changes. US startup firms thrived under these technological shifts, displacing US incumbent firms. Japanese startups did poorly. European firms encountered the worst of both worlds: its incumbent firms were frequently displaced by technological changes, as were US firms; while startup firms (with one exception) performed as poorly as those in Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry Chesbrough, 1999. "Arrested development: the experience of European hard disk drive firms in comparison with US and Japanese firms," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 287-329.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:9:y:1999:i:3:p:287-329
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Agarwal, Rajshree & Echambadi, Raj & Franco, April M. & Sarkar, M. B., 2002. "Knowledge Transfer through Congenital Learning: Spin-Out Generation, Growth and Survival," Working Papers 02-0101, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business.
    2. Murmann, Johann Peter & Frenken, Koen, 2006. "Toward a systematic framework for research on dominant designs, technological innovations, and industrial change," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 925-952, September.
    3. Dedrick, Jason & Kraemer, Kenneth L., 2015. "Who captures value from science-based innovation? The distribution of benefits from GMR in the hard disk drive industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1615-1628.
    4. Steven Klepper & Sally Sleeper, 2005. "Entry by Spinoffs," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 51(8), pages 1291-1306, August.
    5. Ernkvist, Mirko, 2015. "Velocity shifts in the creative economy: incumbent-entrant dynamics in the emergence of Japanese social games," Ratio Working Papers 267, The Ratio Institute.
    6. Guido Buenstorf, 2016. "Schumpeterian incumbents and industry evolution," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 823-836, October.
    7. Chesbrough, Henry W., 2003. "Environmental influences upon firm entry into new sub-markets: Evidence from the worldwide hard disk drive industry conditionally," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 659-678, April.
    8. Ansari, Shahzad (Shaz) & Krop, Pieter, 2012. "Incumbent performance in the face of a radical innovation: Towards a framework for incumbent challenger dynamics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1357-1374.
    9. Cohen, Wesley M., 2010. "Fifty Years of Empirical Studies of Innovative Activity and Performance," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    10. Emmanuel Duguet & Stéphanie Monjon, 2004. "Is innovation persistent at the firm Level . An econometric examination comparing the propensity score and regression methods," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v04075, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Comparative industry evolution ; Technological evolution ; Institutional economics;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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