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Combining Keynes and Schumpeter. Ingvar Svennilson’s contribution to the Swedish growth school and modern economics

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  • Lennart Erixon

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Abstract

In a study of European growth in the interwar period, the Swedish economist Ingvar Svennilson integrated a Keynesian theory of demand-led cumulative growth with a Schumpeterian analysis of transformation. Today, Svennilson is seen, together with the Schumpeterian economists Johan Åkerman and Erik Dahmén, as members of a unique Swedish growth school. A combination of Keynes and Schumpeter with Svennilson as a mediator has been facilitated by neo-Schumpeterian theories of demand-led innovations. But it has been obstructed by a hypothesis in the Schumpeterian tradition that productivity growth is stimulated by low aggregate demand and by Svennilson’s strong commitment to “Verdoorn’s Law” which actually is Svennilson’s Law. However, Svennilson’s analyses of the importance of short-run imbalances for economic growth and the existence of imperfect capital markets discriminating progressive new firms have direct equivalences in modern macroeconomics. Svennilson’s main contributions to economics of today are his syntheses between macroeconomic and structural analysis, short and long run theoretical perspectives and, more basically, between theoretical and empirical research. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Lennart Erixon, 2005. "Combining Keynes and Schumpeter. Ingvar Svennilson’s contribution to the Swedish growth school and modern economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 187-210, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:15:y:2005:i:2:p:187-210
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-005-0243-2
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    Cited by:

    1. Lundquist, Karl-Johan & Olander, Lars-Olof & Svensson Henning, Martin, 2008. "Creative destruction and economic welfare in Swedish regions: spatial dimensions of structural change, growth and employment," SRE-Discussion Papers 2008/03, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Daniele Tavani & Luke Petach, 0. "Firm beliefs and long-run demand effects in a labor-constrained model of growth and distribution," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-25.
    3. Erixon, Lennart, 2009. "Development Blocks, Faulty Investment and Structural Tensions – The Åkerman- Dahmén Theory of the Business Cycle," Research Papers in Economics 2009:9, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    4. Karl-Johan Lundquist & Lars-Olof Olander & Martin Svensson Henning, 2008. "Creative destruction and economic welfare in Swedish regions: Spatial dimensions of structural change, growth and employment," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2008_03, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovations; Cumulative growth; Productivity growth; Verdoorn’s law; Swedish growth school;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • E11 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Marxian; Sraffian; Kaleckian
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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