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Explaining educational inequalities in adolescent life satisfaction: do health behaviour and gender matter?

Author

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  • Irene Moor

    ()

  • Thomas Lampert
  • Katharina Rathmann
  • Benjamin Kuntz
  • Petra Kolip
  • Jacob Spallek
  • Matthias Richter

Abstract

The relationship between educational track and life satisfaction is substantially mediated by health-related behaviours. To tackle inequalities in adolescent health, behavioural factors should be targeted at adolescents from lower educational tracks, with special focus on gender differences. Copyright Swiss School of Public Health 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Irene Moor & Thomas Lampert & Katharina Rathmann & Benjamin Kuntz & Petra Kolip & Jacob Spallek & Matthias Richter, 2014. "Explaining educational inequalities in adolescent life satisfaction: do health behaviour and gender matter?," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(2), pages 309-317, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:59:y:2014:i:2:p:309-317
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-013-0531-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richter, Matthias & Erhart, Michael & Vereecken, Carine A. & Zambon, Alessio & Boyce, William & Gabhainn, Saoirse Nic, 2009. "The role of behavioural factors in explaining socio-economic differences in adolescent health: A multilevel study in 33 countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 396-403, August.
    2. Denton, Margaret & Prus, Steven & Walters, Vivienne, 2004. "Gender differences in health: a Canadian study of the psychosocial, structural and behavioural determinants of health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(12), pages 2585-2600, June.
    3. Matthews, Sharon & Manor, Orly & Power, Chris, 1999. "Social inequalities in health: are there gender differences?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 49-60, January.
    4. Torsheim, Torbjørn & Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike & Hetland, Jorn & Välimaa, Raili & Danielson, Mia & Overpeck, Mary, 2006. "Cross-national variation of gender differences in adolescent subjective health in Europe and North America," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 815-827, February.
    5. Ronald Iannotti & Ian Janssen & Ellen Haug & Hanna Kololo & Beatrice Annaheim & Alberto Borraccino, 2009. "Interrelationships of adolescent physical activity, screen-based sedentary behaviour, and social and psychological health," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 54(2), pages 191-198, September.
    6. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10510 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Thrane, Christer, 2006. "Explaining educational-related inequalities in health: Mediation and moderator models," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 467-478, January.
    8. Kate Levin & Torbjorn Torsheim & Wilma Vollebergh & Matthias Richter & Carolyn Davies & Christina Schnohr & Pernille Due & Candace Currie, 2011. "National Income and Income Inequality, Family Affluence and Life Satisfaction Among 13 year Old Boys and Girls: A Multilevel Study in 35 Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 104(2), pages 179-194, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Su Kye & Keeho Park, 2014. "Health-related determinants of happiness in Korean adults," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(5), pages 731-738, October.
    2. Yekaterina Chzhen & Irene Moor & William Pickett & Emilia Toczydlowska & Gonneke Stevens & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2016. "Family Affluence and Inequality in Adolescent Health and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the HBSC study 2002-2014," Papers inwopa836, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Karl Peltzer & Supa Pengpid, 2015. "Correlates of healthy fruit and vegetable diet in students in low, middle and high income countries," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 79-90, January.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:136:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1542-8 is not listed on IDEAS

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