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Ideational and Economic Causes of the Rise in Non-marital Childbearing in the Czech Republic

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  • Martina Štípková

Abstract

This paper analyses the increase in non-marital childbearing in the Czech Republic during the first two decades following the demise of state socialism. The proportion of mothers who gave birth as unmarried increased more than fourfold during this period. The aim is to explain the reasons for this increase and its socioeconomic variation. Three explanations are tested: growing individualisation, increasing economic uncertainty, and adjustment to a policy that provided more support for single mothers. Data, taken from the national birth register, regarding the marital status of mothers are used to estimate multilevel models with contexts defined by combinations of regions and years. The results are most in line with the first explanation: the change in values due to a rise in individualism and personal autonomy. Economic uncertainty is also found to have a moderate effect among women with up to a secondary education, especially the lower (vocational) level. The influence of policy is weak and is limited to mothers with the lowest level of education. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Martina Štípková, 2015. "Ideational and Economic Causes of the Rise in Non-marital Childbearing in the Czech Republic," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 31(5), pages 473-494, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:31:y:2015:i:5:p:473-494
    DOI: 10.1007/s10680-015-9350-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tomáš Sobotka & Anna Šťastná & Kryštof Zeman & Dana Hamplová & Vladimíra Kantorová, 2008. "Czech Republic: A rapid transformation of fertility and family behaviour after the collapse of state socialism," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(14), pages 403-454.
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