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Cross-country catch-up in the manufacturing sector: Impacts of heterogeneity on convergence and technology adoption


  • Patrik T. Hultberg


  • M. Ishaq Nadiri
  • Robin C. Sickles


We analyze how technology transfer from a leading economy affects followers’ productivity growth in manufacturing sectors and Gross Domestic Product. Allowing for heterogeneous technology levels we explore how this impacts rates of catch-up in labor productivity across manufacturing sectors and GDP for 16 OECD nations. Our results indicate that aggregate studies bias downward the estimated rates of catch-up. These rates of catch-up, as well as efficiency levels, also differ across countries. We find that institutional factors such as bureaucratic efficiency are important determinants of the estimated catch-up rates. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Patrik T. Hultberg & M. Ishaq Nadiri & Robin C. Sickles, 2004. "Cross-country catch-up in the manufacturing sector: Impacts of heterogeneity on convergence and technology adoption," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 753-768, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:29:y:2004:i:4:p:753-768 DOI: 10.1007/s00181-004-0209-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francis Teal & Markus Eberhardt, 2010. "Productivity Analysis in Global Manufacturing Production," Economics Series Working Papers 515, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Aditi Bhattacharyya, 2012. "Adjustment of inputs and measurement of technical efficiency: A dynamic panel data analysis of the Egyptian manufacturing sectors," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 863-880, June.
    3. Robin C. Sickles & Jiaqi Hao & Chenjun Shang, 2014. "Panel data and productivity measurement: an analysis of Asian productivity trends," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 211-231, August.
    4. Sickles, Robin C. & Hao, Jiaqi & Shang, Chenjun, 2015. "Panel Data and Productivity Measurement," Working Papers 15-018, Rice University, Department of Economics.
    5. Alexander Yu. Apokin & Irina Ipatova, 2016. "How R&D Expenditures Influence Total Factor Productivity and Technical Efficiency?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 128/EC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    6. Ana Lozano-Vivas & Jesús Pastor, 2006. "Relating Macro-economic Efficiency to Financial Efficiency: A Comparison of Fifteen OECD Countries Over an Eighteen Year Period," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 67-78, April.
    7. Batóg Jacek & Batóg Barbara, 2007. "Productivity Changes in the European Union: Structural and Competitive Aspects," Folia Oeconomica Stetinensia, De Gruyter Open, vol. 6(1), pages 63-74, January.
    8. Maciej Grodzicki, 2013. "Productivity Convergence in Manufacturing in the European Union: The Role of Economic Structure," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 5(2).
    9. Batóg Barbara & Batóg Jacek & Mojsiewicz Magdalena, 2009. "Application of Kernel Estimation in Analysis of Labour Productivity of the Largest Polish Firms in 2004-2008," Folia Oeconomica Stetinensia, De Gruyter Open, vol. 8(1), pages 126-139, January.
    10. Arnab Bhattacharjee & Eduardo Castro & Chris Jensen-Butler, 2009. "Regional variation in productivity: a study of the Danish economy," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 195-212, June.

    More about this item


    International comparisons; panel data methods; convergence and catch-up in best-practice technologies; O47; O57; C33; C41;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies


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