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Research with Children: Lessons Learned from the International Survey of Children’s Wellbeing

Author

Listed:
  • Daphna Gross-Manos

    (Tel-Hai College)

  • Hanita Kosher

    (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

  • Asher Ben-Arieh

    (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed the rising importance of studying children's lives and wellbeing from their own perspective. That said, studying children as participants of the study, rather than studying their parents or observing them as objects raises great challenges and dilemmas. The current paper examines them in an exploratory analysis of the Children's Worlds international survey of children's subjective wellbeing, by examining the international survey process, focusing on ethical and practical aspects of data collection from children. Research teams in 35 countries that took part in the survey submitted a questionnaire regarding their data collection process, including the number of ethical permissions required, type of permissions, school participation rates, objections to the study, etc. Findings reveal that the majority of countries required at least two permissions, and 40% required four and more. Additionally, an increasing requirement for parental active permission was observed. Approximately 80% of countries reported encountering objections to the study. Countries reporting only one required permission also reported 100% school participation, while countries requiring four or five permissions reported 53% average school participation rate, indicating that as the number of required permissions increased, chances of child participation decreased. Findings largely support the gatekeepers phenomena in studying children, thus we discuss conclusions and implications for research directly involving children.

Suggested Citation

  • Daphna Gross-Manos & Hanita Kosher & Asher Ben-Arieh, 2021. "Research with Children: Lessons Learned from the International Survey of Children’s Wellbeing," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 14(5), pages 2097-2118, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:chinre:v:14:y:2021:i:5:d:10.1007_s12187-021-09829-w
    DOI: 10.1007/s12187-021-09829-w
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roger A. Hart, 1992. "Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship," Papers inness92/6, Innocenti Essay.
    2. Asher Ben-Arieh, 2005. "Where are the Children? Children’s Role in Measuring and Monitoring Their Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 74(3), pages 573-596, December.
    3. Ferran Casas & Germà Coenders & Robert Cummins & Mònica González & Cristina Figuer & Sara Malo, 2008. "Does subjective well-being show a relationship between parents and their children?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 197-205, June.
    4. Dinisman, Tamar & Montserrat, Carme & Casas, Ferran, 2012. "The subjective well-being of Spanish adolescents: Variations according to different living arrangements," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2374-2380.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Eirini Leriou, 2023. "Understanding and Measuring Child Well-being in the Region of Attica, Greece: Round Five," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 16(4), pages 1395-1451, August.
    3. Eirini Leriou, 2022. "Understanding and Measuring Child Well-being in the Region of Attica, Greece: Round four," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(6), pages 1967-2011, December.

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