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Reconciling and translating migration data collected over time intervals of differing widths

Author

Listed:
  • Andrei Rogers
  • James Raymer

    ()

  • K. Bruce Newbold

    ()

Abstract

In this paper we describe and contrast the age and spatial structures of migration identified by data collected over one-year and five-year time intervals, by focusing, in particular, on the generation and distribution components of age- and origin-destination-specific migration flows. We explore the contributions of primary, return, and onward migration defined by fixed interval migration data, and we outline a crude translation procedure for transforming the one-year migration flow data into an estimated five-year counterpart. The data used in this study represent several migration periods drawn from recent U.S. and Canadian censuses and surveys. Differences between the structures exhibited by U.S. and Canadian migration patterns, collected over one-year and five-year migration time intervals, are carefully examined and contrasted. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Andrei Rogers & James Raymer & K. Bruce Newbold, 2003. "Reconciling and translating migration data collected over time intervals of differing widths," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 37(4), pages 581-601, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:37:y:2003:i:4:p:581-601
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-003-0128-y
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    Cited by:

    1. Kentaro Nakajima & Takatoshi Tabuchi, 2011. "Estimating Interregional Utility Differentials," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 31-46, February.
    2. Martin Bell & Elin Charles-Edwards & Philipp Ueffing & John Stillwell & Marek Kupiszewski & Dorota Kupiszewska, 2015. "Internal Migration and Development: Comparing Migration Intensities Around the World," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 41(1), pages 33-58, March.
    3. K. Newbold, 2012. "Migration and regional science: opportunities and challenges in a changing environment," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 451-468, April.
    4. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0832-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Jack DeWaard & Katherine J. Curtis & Glenn V. Fuguitt, 2016. "The 'New Great Migration' of Blacks to the U.S. South," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(31), pages 885-898, May.
    6. Karen Smith Conway & Jonathan C. Rork, 2016. "How Has Elderly Migration Changed in the Twenty-First Century? What the Data Can—and Cannot—Tell Us," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1011-1025, August.

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