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What Have We Learned About Productivity in the Last Two Decades?: A Review Article on New Developments in Productivity Analysis

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  • Andrew Sharpe

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Abstract

What have we learned about productivity in the past two decades? In this article, Andrew Sharpe from the Centre for the Study of Living Standards reviews a recently published NBER volume entitled New Development in Productivity Analysis, edited by Charles R. Hulten, Edwin R. Dean, and Michael J. Harper. The volume includes 13 papers, many representing the frontier of productivity research. Key recent developments in productivity analysis, as evidenced by the volume, include the development of firm-level micro-data bases, the revival of the vintage capital or embodiment approach to productivity analysis, the enhancement of our understanding of international differences in service sector productivity levels through case studies undertaken by the McKinsey Global Institute, and the integration of natural resources and the environment into a total resource productivity framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Sharpe, 2002. "What Have We Learned About Productivity in the Last Two Decades?: A Review Article on New Developments in Productivity Analysis," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 4, pages 53-63, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:4:y:2002:5
    as

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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/4/review-e.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/4/review-f.pdf
    File Function: version en francais, pp:57-68
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 49-74.
    2. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 49-74.
    3. Richard G. Lipsey & Kenneth Carlaw, 2000. "What Does Total Factor Productivity Measure?," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 1, pages 31-40, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ad van Riet & Moreno Roma, 2006. "Competition, productivity and prices in the euro area services sector," Occasional Paper Series 44, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Review; New Developments in Productivity Analysis; Hulten; Dean; Harper; Productivity; Research; Total Factor Productivity; Residual; Theory; Data; BLS; Factor Demand Model; Capital; Embodiment Approach; Comparisons; International; McKinsey; Service Sector; Natural Resources; Mulitfactor; Mulit-Factor; BEA;

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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