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Armington Product Variety Growth in Small versus Large Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Egger
  • Martin Gassebner
  • Andrea Lassmann

Abstract

Recent work in international economics provides insights into the measurement of product variety change - i.e., the change at the extensive margin of trade - and its consequences for a country's welfare. In such work, the measurement of product variety change is typically taken as given. There is evidence that product variety change is the main source of gains from trade (see Hummels and Klenow, 2005; and Broda and Weinstein, 2006). However, little is known as to what determines product variety growth, e.g., from an Armington perspective as here, and what we can subsequently learn for the inclination of countries, depending on their characteristics, towards trade liberalization. Results in this paper shed first light on a possible nexus between Armingtontype product variety change (i.e., product diversity by virtue of country of origin) and economic size of countries. Our future research will venture to provide an answer to the question about the key determinants of product variety and as to the heterogeneous consequences of trade liberalization across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Egger & Martin Gassebner & Andrea Lassmann, 2009. "Armington Product Variety Growth in Small versus Large Countries," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 145(IV), pages 411-419, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ses:arsjes:2009-iv-4
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    File URL: http://www.sjes.ch/papers/2009-IV-4.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2006. "Globalization and the Gains From Variety," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 541-585.
    2. Feenstra, Robert C, 1994. "New Product Varieties and the Measurement of International Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 157-177, March.
    3. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    4. David Hummels & Peter J. Klenow, 2005. "The Variety and Quality of a Nation's Exports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 704-723, June.
    5. Feenstra, Robert & Kee, Hiau Looi, 2008. "Export variety and country productivity: Estimating the monopolistic competition model with endogenous productivity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 500-518, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lukas Mohler, 2011. "Variety Gains from Trade in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 147(I), pages 45-70, March.
    2. Christian Hepenstrick, 2016. "The Sources and Magnitudes of Switzerland's Gains from Trade," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 152(I), pages 1-21, March.
    3. Christian Hepenstrick, 2016. "Switzerland's gains from trade with Europe:," Aussenwirtschaft, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research, vol. 67(03), pages 25-42, December.
    4. Christian Hepenstrick, 2011. "The sources and magnitudes of Switzerland’s gains from trade," ECON - Working Papers 006, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Product variety; Armington differentiation model;

    JEL classification:

    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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