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“If you don’t know what port you are sailing to, no wind is favorable” Appointment Preferences of Management Professors

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  • Marina Fiedler
  • Isabell Welpe

Abstract

Based on a survey of university management professors in German-speaking Europe, we analyze the relationship between individual and organizational characteristics and university academics’ preferences in appointment decisions. Senior faculty’s attitude towards change proves to be a particular robust predictor of differences in appointment preferences. Faculty who were satisfied with university structures before any reforms place greater value on high-quality monographs and the possession of the venia legendi. Faculty who welcome the aims of university reforms value prestigious journal publications and international experience in applicants. Our results confirm previous homophily and similarity research by showing that university professors value characteristics and qualifications that they themselves possess. Our results also show that differences in appointment preferences depend on whether universities are publicly or privately financed, and their rank in the CHE reputation ranking.

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  • Marina Fiedler & Isabell Welpe, 2008. "“If you don’t know what port you are sailing to, no wind is favorable” Appointment Preferences of Management Professors," Schmalenbach Business Review (sbr), LMU Munich School of Management, vol. 60(1), pages 4-31, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sbr:abstra:v:60:y:2008:i:1:p:4-31
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    Cited by:

    1. Agnes Bäker & Susanne Breuninger & Julia Muschallik & Kerstin Pull & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2016. "Time to Go? (Inter)National Mobility and Appointment Success of Young Academics," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 17(3), pages 401-421, December.
    2. Bäker, Agnes, 2015. "Non-tenured post-doctoral researchers’ job mobility and research output: An analysis of the role of research discipline, department size, and coauthors," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 634-650.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic Careers; Appointment Preferences; Bologna Process; Individual Influencing Factors; Organizational Change; Organizational Influencing Factors; Personnel Selection Decisions; Selection Criteria; University Reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • A29 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Other
    • M20 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics - - - General
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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