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Bridging Urban Digital Divides? Urban Polarisation and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs)

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  • Stephen Graham

    (Centre for Urban Technology, School of Architecture ,Planning and Landscape, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NEI 7RU, UK s.dn.graham@ncl.ac.uk)

Abstract

The societal diffusion of information and communications technologies (ICTs) remains starkly uneven at all scales. It is in the contemporary city that this unevenness becomes most visible. In cities, clusters and enclaves of 'superconnected' people, firms and institutions often rest cheek-by-jowel with large numbers of people with non-existent or rudimentary access to communications technologies. In such a context, this paper has two objectives, reflected in its two parts. The first part of the paper seeks to demonstrate that dominant trends in ICT development are currently helping to support new extremes of social and geographical unevenness within and between human settlements and cities, in both the North and the South. The paper's second part aims to explore the prospect that such stark 'urban digital divides' might be ameliorated through progressive and innovative policy initiatives which treat cities and electronic technologies in parallel. It does this using a range of illustrative exemplars from a variety of contexts.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Graham, 2002. "Bridging Urban Digital Divides? Urban Polarisation and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs)," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(1), pages 33-56, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:39:y:2002:i:1:p:33-56
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    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Calvin, 2018. "Broadband and Uneven Spatial Development: The Case of Cardiff City-Region," MPRA Paper 86636, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sorin Cohn & Barry Gander & Jennifer Percival & Tamas Koplyay, 2016. "Managing Progress Towards Intelligent Community Status with the i-CAT Assessment Tools," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 7(1), pages 172-192, March.
    3. Morgane De Halleux & Antonio Estache, 2018. "How “smart” are Latin American cities?," Working Papers ECARES 2018-05, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. repec:asg:wpaper:1025 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:telpol:v:39:y:2015:i:3:p:218-240 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Sorin Cohn & Barry Gander & Jennifer Percival & Tamas Koplyay, 2016. "Managing Progress Towards Intelligent Community Status with the i-CAT Assessment Tools," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 7(1), pages 172-192, March.
    7. Greig, Malcolm Stewart & Lindsay, Colin & McQuaid, Ronald W., 2002. "Delivering job search services in rural labour markets: the role of ICT," ERSA conference papers ersa02p235, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Willem van Winden & Paulus Woets, 2003. "Urban Broadband Internet Policies in Europe: A Critical Review," ERSA conference papers ersa03p76, European Regional Science Association.
    9. repec:eee:tefoso:v:137:y:2018:i:c:p:330-339 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Elizabeth A. Mack & Luc Anselin & Tony H. Grubesic, 2011. "The importance of broadband provision to knowledge intensive firm location," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 17-35, March.
    11. Elizabeth A. Mack, 2014. "Broadband and knowledge intensive firm clusters: Essential link or auxiliary connection?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 3-29, March.

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