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Cases, Mechanisms and the Real: The Theory and Methodology of Mixed-Method Social Network Analysis

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  • Nick Crossley
  • Gemma Edwards

Abstract

In this paper we make a methodological case for mixed method social network analysis (MMSNA). We begin by both challenging the idea, prevalent in some quarters, that mixing methods means combining incompatible epistemological or theoretical assumptions and by positing an ontological argument in favour of mixed methods. We then suggest a methodological framework for MMSNA and argue for the importance of ‘mechanisms’ in relational-sociological research. Finally, we discuss two examples of MMSNA from our own research, using them to illustrate arguments from the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Nick Crossley & Gemma Edwards, 2016. "Cases, Mechanisms and the Real: The Theory and Methodology of Mixed-Method Social Network Analysis," Sociological Research Online, , vol. 21(2), pages 217-285, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:socres:v:21:y:2016:i:2:p:217-285
    DOI: 10.5153/sro.3920
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    File URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.5153/sro.3920
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Louise Ryan & Jon Mulholland & Agnes Agoston, 2014. "Talking Ties: Reflecting on Network Visualisation and Qualitative Interviewing," Sociological Research Online, , vol. 19(2), pages 1-12, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashleigh Watson, 2020. "Methods Braiding: A Technique for Arts-Based and Mixed-Methods Research," Sociological Research Online, , vol. 25(1), pages 66-83, March.

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