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Yesterday’s Gains Versus Today’s Realties

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffery L. Osgood Jr.

    (West Chester University, West Chester, PA, USA)

  • Susan M. Opp

    (Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA)

  • R. Lorraine Bernotsky

    (West Chester University, West Chester, PA, USA)

Abstract

The past decade has been one of the more turbulent in terms of the economic pressures felt by localities. Through three national-level surveys taken at five-year intervals over the previous decade, the authors examine changes in the use of economic development strategies employed by localities with populations more than 10 000. Despite reporting having moved away from a reliance on business incentives to a broader set of strategies, we find that after the recent recession, localities are relying on business incentives at their highest levels in 10 years. Moreover, the most recent survey results suggest that there are observable patterns among localities and their use of first-, second-, and third-wave strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffery L. Osgood Jr. & Susan M. Opp & R. Lorraine Bernotsky, 2012. "Yesterday’s Gains Versus Today’s Realties," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 26(4), pages 334-350, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:26:y:2012:i:4:p:334-350
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Victoria Basolo & Chihyen Huang, 2001. "Cities and Economic Development: Does the City Limits Story Still Apply?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 15(4), pages 327-339, November.
    2. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & Hui Li, 2009. "Who Wins From Local Economic Development?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 23(1), pages 13-27, February.
    3. Timothy J. Bartik, "undated". "Who Benefits from Local Job Growth: Migrants or Original Residents?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb1993rs, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Craig Gundersen & James Ziliak, 2004. "Poverty and macroeconomic performance across space, race, and family structure," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 61-86, February.
    5. Barbara Bergmann, 2010. "Is Prosperity Possible Without Growth?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(5), pages 49-56.
    6. Margaret E. Dewar, 1998. "Why State and Local Economic Development Programs Cause so Little Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 12(1), pages 68-87, February.
    7. Ellis Delken, 2008. "Happiness in shrinking cities in Germany," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 213-218, June.
    8. Roger B. Hammer & Gary P. Green, 1996. "Local Growth Promotion: Policy Adoption versus Effort," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 10(4), pages 331-341, November.
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