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U.S. Micropolitan Area Growth: A Spatial Equilibrium Growth Analysis

  • Davidsson, Michael

    (Oklahoma State University)

  • Rickman, Dan S.

    (Oklahoma State University)

Because U.S. micropolitan areas have only relatively recently been awarded official status, little is known about their comparative economic performance. Yet, since their inception economic performance among micropolitan areas has received considerable attention from the public and local area policymakers. This paper examines micropolitan area growth during the 1990s, a period of strong national growth. A spatial equilibrium growth framework and estimated reduced-form regressions containing an extensive number of variables are used to assess the sources of differentials in micropolitan area growth. Overall, differences in productivity growth appeared to primarily underlie micropolitan area growth differentials, though household amenities and the elasticity of housing supply also appeared to be nearly as important.

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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 41 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2,3 (Fall, Winter)
Pages: 179-203

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:41:y:2011:i:2:p:179-203
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  1. Partridge Mark D. & Rickman Dan S & Ali Kamar & Olfert M. Rose, 2008. "Employment Growth in the American Urban Hierarchy: Long Live Distance," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-38, March.
  2. Haurin, Donald R, 1980. "The Regional Distribution of Population, Migration, and Climate," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 293-308, September.
  3. David Mcgranahan & Timothy Wojan, 2007. "Recasting the Creative Class to Examine Growth Processes in Rural and Urban Counties," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 197-216.
  4. James LeSage & Matthew Dominguez, 2012. "The importance of modeling spatial spillovers in public choice analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 525-545, March.
  5. JunJie Wu & Munisamy Gopinath, 2008. "What Causes Spatial Variations in Economic Development in the United States?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), pages 392-408.
  6. David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2012. "The China Syndrome: Local Labor Market Effects of Import Competition in the United States," NBER Working Papers 18054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Dan S. Rickman & Shane D. Rickman, 2011. "Population Growth In High‐Amenity Nonmetropolitan Areas: What'S The Prognosis?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 863-879, December.
  8. Edward L. Glaeser & Kristina Tobio, 2008. "The Rise of the Sunbelt," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 610-643, January.
  9. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 1999. "Which comes first, jobs or people? An analysis of the recent stylized facts," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 117-123, July.
  10. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-78, December.
  11. Mark Ferguson & Kamar Ali & M. Rose Olfert & Mark Partridge, 2007. "Voting with Their Feet: Jobs versus Amenities," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 77-110.
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