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Does Trade Foster Institutions? An Empirical Assessment

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  • Marcella Nicolini
  • Alessia Paccagnini

Abstract

The relationship between trade and institutions has been extensively debated by trade economists and political scientists. The aim of the present paper is to provide some empirical evidence on the causal relationship between institutions and trade flows in a panel framework. We present a Granger causality test (1969) as well as a Hurlin and Venet (2001) test for panel data using a bilateral trade flows panel that covers 29 years. The issue of zero flows of trade is handled by using a panel Poisson Pseudo-Maximum Likelihood estimator.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcella Nicolini & Alessia Paccagnini, 2011. "Does Trade Foster Institutions? An Empirical Assessment," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 2(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:pia:review:v:2:y:2011:i:2:n:4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christophe Hurlin, 2005. "Un test simple de l'hypothèse de non-causalité dans un modèle de panel hétérogène," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 56(3), pages 799-809.
    2. Wen-Cheng Lu & Jong-Rong Chen & Chia-Ling Wang, 2006. "Granger causality test on R&D spatial spillovers and productivity growth," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(13), pages 857-861.
    3. Toke S. Aidt & Martin Gassebner, 2010. "Do Autocratic States Trade Less?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 38-76, January.
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    5. Tavares, Jose & Wacziarg, Romain, 2001. "How democracy affects growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1341-1378, August.
    6. Mayer, Wolfgang, 1984. "Endogenous Tariff Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 970-985, December.
    7. Granger, Clive W. J., 2003. "Some aspects of causal relationships," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 69-71, January.
    8. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    9. Hood, M. V. & Kidd, Quentin & Morris, Irwin L., 2008. "Two Sides of the Same Coin? Employing Granger Causality Tests in a Time Series Cross-Section Framework," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(03), pages 324-344, June.
    10. Daron Acemoglu & Pol Antràs & Elhanan Helpman, 2007. "Contracts and Technology Adoption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 916-943, June.
    11. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Krenz, Astrid & Abeliansky, Ana, 2016. "Democracy and International Trade: Differential Effects from a Panel Quantile Regression Framework," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145788, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Abeliansky, Ana & Krenz, Astrid, 2015. "Democracy and international trade: Differential effects from a panel quantile regression framework," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 243, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Krenz, Astrid, 2016. "Do political institutions influence international trade? Measurement of institutions and the Long-Run effects," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 276, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Law, Siong Hook & Lim, Thong Cheen & Ismail, Normaz Wana, 2013. "Institutions and economic development: A Granger causality analysis of panel data evidence," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 610-624.
    5. Khalid, Usman, 2015. "Why Trading with Dictators May Nevertheless Help the People: On the Interplay between Trade, Political Regimes and Economic Institutions," Working Papers 2015:15, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 23 Jul 2015.
    6. Astrid Krenz & Ana Abeliansky, 2015. "Democracy and Trade—Evidence along the Distribution of Trading Activity," EcoMod2015 8750, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    institutional quality; Granger causality test; panel data; zero trade flows;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General

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