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Googling the present


  • Graeme Chamberlin

    (Office for National Statistics)


SummaryGoogle Trends data provides weekly reports on the number of search queries made by people in a geographical area and by category. As over three quarters of those who access the Internet regularly are looking for information on goods and services ‐ this information may be a useful indicator of economic activity. For example, the volume of queries may relate to future patterns of spending. This article investigates this use of Google Trends data for various search categories, looking at its correlation with official data on retail sales, property transactions, car registrations and foreign trips.

Suggested Citation

  • Graeme Chamberlin, 2010. "Googling the present," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(12), pages 59-95, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:ecolmr:v:4:y:2010:i:12:p:59-95

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:zbw:rwirep:0382 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alessia Naccarato & Andrea Pierini & Stefano Falorsi, 2015. "Using Google Trend Data To Predict The Italian Unemployment Rate," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0203, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
    3. Schmidt, Torsten & Vosen, Simeon, 2012. "Using Internet Data to Account for Special Events in Economic Forecasting," Ruhr Economic Papers 382, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Javier Sebastian, 2016. "Blockchain in financial services: Regulatory landscape and future challenges," Working Papers 16/21, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    5. Torsten Schmidt & Simeon Vosen, 2012. "Using Internet Data to Account for Special Events in Economic Forecasting," Ruhr Economic Papers 0382, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Vicente, María Rosalía & López-Menéndez, Ana J. & Pérez, Rigoberto, 2015. "Forecasting unemployment with internet search data: Does it help to improve predictions when job destruction is skyrocketing?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 132-139.

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