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Labour supply estimates for married women in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Rosanna Scutella

    () (The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This analysis uses a sample selection model to estimate the hours of work decision for married women in Australia using unit record data for 1995 and 1996. Hours of work are found to be positively related to the after tax wage rate and negatively related to unearned income (which includes social security benefits). Other characteristics of married women are also found to have an effect on the labour supply decision. Wage elasticities are calculated from the results of the labour supply estimation. These show considerable heterogeneity in married women's responsiveness to the wage rate between different demographic types.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosanna Scutella, 2000. "Labour supply estimates for married women in Australia," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 4(3), pages 152-172, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ozl:journl:v:4:y:2001:i:3:p:152-172
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Breunig & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Xiaodong Gong, 2008. "Improving the Modelling of Couples' Labour Supply," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(267), pages 466-485, December.
    2. Ross Guest & Nick Parr, 2013. "Family policy and couples’ labour supply: an empirical assessment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1631-1660, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Time Allocation and Labor Supply (Hours of Work; Part-Time Employment; Work Sharing; Absenteeism) Fiscal Policies and Behaviour of Economic Agents; Household (Effects on Labor Supply) Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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