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Physician's Advice Affects Adoption of Desirable Dietary Behaviors

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  • Maria L. Loureiro
  • Rodolfo M. Nayga

Abstract

Due to the prevalence of and economic costs associated with poor dietary behaviors, the purpose of our research is to investigate the relationship between receipt of physician's dietary advice and the individual's tendency to adopt the desirable dietary behavior. Using a trivariate probit model, we find that physician's advice has dramatic positive effects on the probability of both eating fewer high fat and high cholesterol foods and on eating more fruits and vegetables to reduce risk of developing heart disease or stroke. Copyright 2007, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria L. Loureiro & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2007. "Physician's Advice Affects Adoption of Desirable Dietary Behaviors," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 29(2), pages 318-330.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:29:y:2007:i:2:p:318-330
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9353.2007.00345.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Berning, Joshua, 2015. "The role of physicians in promoting weight loss," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 104-115.
    2. Steven Garasky & Susan Stewart & Craig Gundersen & Brenda Lohman, 2010. "Toward a Fuller Understanding of Nonresident Father Involvement: An Examination of Child Support, In-Kind Support, and Visitation," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(3), pages 363-393, June.
    3. Steven S. Vickner, 2017. "Friend or PHO? On the Marginal Valuation of Reducing the Content of Trans Fat in Processed Foods," Advances in Management and Applied Economics, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(2), pages 1-2.
    4. Yen, Steven T. & Lin, Biing-Hwan & Davis, Christopher G., 2008. "Consumer knowledge and meat consumption at home and away from home," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 631-639, December.
    5. Marjon Pol & Deirdre Hennessy & Braden Manns, 2017. "The role of time and risk preferences in adherence to physician advice on health behavior change," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(3), pages 373-386, April.

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