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The State of Environmental and Resource Economics: A Google Scholar Perspective


  • Maximilian Auffhammer


Until recently, ISI Thompson's Web of Science-Social Sciences Citation Index was the only rigorous tool for tracking citation counts of academic research papers. The recent emergence of Google Scholar provides an alternative measure for tracking citation counts for refereed journal articles, conference proceedings, working papers, and government reports. This article provides an overview of the state of environmental and resource economics using the Google Scholar measure of citations. It ranks and compares the major field journals, and the most cited papers in these journals, the most cited papers in the field that have been published in general economics journals, and the most cited technical books and textbooks, as well as the most cited researchers in the field. Copyright 2009, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Maximilian Auffhammer, 2009. "The State of Environmental and Resource Economics: A Google Scholar Perspective," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(2), pages 251-269, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:renvpo:v:3:y:2009:i:2:p:251-269

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Burtraw, Dallas & Sweeney, Richard & Walls, Margaret, 2009. "The Incidence of U.S. Climate Policy: Alternative Uses of Revenues From a Cap-and-Trade Auction," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 62(3), pages 497-518, September.
    2. Carolyn Fischer & Alan K. Fox, 2007. "Output-Based Allocation of Emissions Permits for Mitigating Tax and Trade Interactions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(4), pages 575-599.
    3. Burtraw, Dallas & Kahn, Danny & Palmer, Karen, 2006. "CO2 Allowance Allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the Effect on Electricity Investors," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 79-90, March.
    4. Carolyn Fischer, 2003. "Combining rate-based and cap-and-trade emissions policies," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(sup2), pages 89-103, December.
    5. Dallas Burtraw & William Shobe, 2008. "State and Local Climate Policy under a National Emissions Floor," Working Papers 2008-05, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
    6. Parry, Ian W. H. & Williams III, Roberton C., 1999. "A second-best evaluation of eight policy instruments to reduce carbon emissions," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 347-373, August.
    7. Spulber, Daniel F., 1985. "Effluent regulation and long-run optimality," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 103-116, June.
    8. Milliman, Scott R. & Prince, Raymond, 1989. "Firm incentives to promote technological change in pollution control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 247-265, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schymura, Michael & Löschel, Andreas, 2012. "Investigating JEEM empirically: A story of co-authorship and collaboration," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-029, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. repec:spr:scient:v:99:y:2014:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1248-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Graham A. Davis, 2012. "Replicating Sachs and Warner: The 1997 Working Paper," Working Papers 2012-08, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    4. Kataria, Mitesh, 2012. "The role of preferences in disagreements over scientific hypothesis: Evidence on cognitive bias in formation of beliefs," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 364-369.
    5. Spash, Clive L., 2013. "The shallow or the deep ecological economics movement?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 351-362.

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