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The Assessment: Technology Policy

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  • Bronwyn H. Hall

Abstract

Current research and problems in science and technology policy are reviewed. Trends in innovative activity in the G-7 economies during the past two decades are summarized and the economic rationale for policy in this area given. Policy tools currently in use in many countries include tax credits and subsidies, the intellectual property system, and competition policy. Ongoing areas of current controversy are the interaction of intellectual property and competition policies, environmental and innovation policy, standard-setting in industries characterized by network externalities, and the privatization of scientific research and its consequences. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bronwyn H. Hall, 2002. "The Assessment: Technology Policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(1), pages 1-9, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:18:y:2002:i:1:p:1-9
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    Cited by:

    1. Dimos, Christos & Pugh, Geoff, 2016. "The effectiveness of R&D subsidies: A meta-regression analysis of the evaluation literature," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 797-815.
    2. Tommy Clausen, 2008. "Do subsidies have positive impacts on R&D and innovation activities at the firm level?," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20070615, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
    3. Clausen, Tommy H., 2009. "Do subsidies have positive impacts on R&D and innovation activities at the firm level?," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 239-253, December.
    4. Elizabeth Webster, 2002. "Intangible and Intellectual Capital: A Review of the Literature," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2002n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Claudia Ghisetti & Massimiliano Mazzanti & Susanna Mancinelli & Mariangela Zoli, 2015. "Do financial constraints make the environment worse off? Understanding the effects of financial barriers on environmental innovations," SEEDS Working Papers 0115, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Jan 2015.
    6. Petri Rouvinen, 2004. "Is Technology Policy Practised as It Is Preached," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 51-62, Autumn.
    7. Gustafsson, Robin & Autio, Erkko, 2011. "A failure trichotomy in knowledge exploration and exploitation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 819-831, July.
    8. Goyal, Ashima, 2005. "New technology and labour Markets: Entrants, outsourcing and matching," MPRA Paper 24620, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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