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Regional Development in Italy: Social Capital and the Mezzogiorno

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  • Leonardi, Robert

Abstract

The article looks at the role of social norms as elements in the facilitation of regional economic development in underdeveloped areas. Drawing upon the findings of "Making Democracy Work: Civic traditions in Modern Italy, " the argument is made that social norms play a vital role in determining a region's potential for economic growth. In the case of the Italian South, social norms emphasizing collective action (i.e. social capital) as a viable means of achieving societal goods are absent. What is present in the South is a culture emphasizing individual norms oriented towards short-term individual gains. On the basis of the distinction between social capital and individual norms, four different models of capitalism are developed and used to explain the different trajectories in economic development that have manifested themselves during the last three decades in southern Italy vis-a-vis the North and Centre of the country. Copyright 1995 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardi, Robert, 1995. "Regional Development in Italy: Social Capital and the Mezzogiorno," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 165-179, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:11:y:1995:i:2:p:165-79
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    Cited by:

    1. Cusack, Thomas R., 1997. "Social capital, institutional structures, and democratic performance: A comparative study of German local governments," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Institutions and Social Change FS III 97-201, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd & van Schaik, Ton, 2005. "Social capital and growth in European regions: an empirical test," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 301-324, June.
    3. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:4:p:675-695 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Pietro Battiston & Simona Gamba, 2016. "When the two ends meet: an experiment on cooperation across the Italian North-South divide," LEM Papers Series 2016/41, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    5. Michael Storper & Lena Levinas & Alejandro Mercado-Celis, 2007. "Society, Community, and Development: A Tale of Two Regions," Post-Print hal-01053957, HAL.
    6. Giovanni Perucca, 2013. "Aredefinition of italian macro-areas: the role of territorial capital," RIVISTA DI ECONOMIA E STATISTICA DEL TERRITORIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(2), pages 37-65.
    7. Beugelsdijk, S. & van Schaik, A.B.T.M., 2001. "Social Capital and Regional Economic Growth," Discussion Paper 2001-102, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    8. Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fachin, 2017. "Regional growth with spatial dependence: A case study on early Italian industrialization," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(4), pages 675-695, November.
    9. Fabio Sabatini, 2010. "Job Instability and Family Planning: Insights from the Italian Puzzle," Working Papers 2010.90, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    10. Sabatini Fabio, 2009. "Work status and family planning: Insights from the Italian puzzle," wp.comunite 0058, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    11. D. Gibbs, 1998. "Regional development agencies and sustainable development," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 365-368.

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